Feng Shui Organizer Missing In Action

You may have noticed that I’ve been absent for the past four or five weeks from my weekly blog, newsletter and emails.  During the holiday season, it is common for most of us to become blitzed with too many obligations, with too much to do.  I suppose I’m no different; however I have been unable to keep up my usual posts and communications, not because of the holiday, but for what I believe to be a normal stage of life.  Normal, but utterly lonely and overwhelming.

My priorities shifted abruptly at the beginning of December and much of my normal life is on hold. On the 4th of December my step-father’s mental status took a turn for the worse, landing him first in the ER, then the hospital, then a rehabilitation and nursing facility, then the healthcare unit of a continuing care facility and finally home.

During that journey I learned that not only my step-father, but also my mother have dementia. Since Mom and John live 90 minutes away, my step-sister and I had to determine the best way to provide them both the care and safety they now need. My step-father’s dementia keeps him primarily unaware of the changes in his life. My mother’s cognitive impairment, however, is more challenging. Because she is more aware of what is going on, she has felt threatened at every turn by the our attempts to make sure she’s safe and has what she needs to stay happy and healthy. Dealing with dementia has been an education in patience, creativity and asking for help.

After spending time in almost all levels of care available to senior citizens, we discovered that a company called Visiting Angels could provide 24-hour in-home care for Mom and John. And, we have enlisted the services of Hospice of Virginia to help John make a peaceful transition from this life to the next. Mom and John are now able to be together in their peaceful home by the water with their cat, Harley.

I have had to do things I had hoped I’d never have to do, like take my mother’s car keys, request her doctor to officially determine that she is not competent to manage her affairs, drive and live independently. My life has felt like a tragic game of chess. Every time I think I’ve made the best plans and life will fall back in order, I’m led down a new path with a new problem to solve.

When exhaustion has threatened to take me under, I have somehow found the strength, guidance and assistance to keep going, guided by love and a commitment to do the right thing for Mom and John, whether they like it or not. There have been many lessons and many blessings.

I’ve learned that what I thought was best for my mother wasn’t. I’ve been blessed with a positive connection with a step-sister I hardly knew. She came to my rescue a number of times when I needed a kick-butt approach to make something happen. We’ve been blessed with help from Mom and John’s neighbors and friends, and the home care of the Visiting Angels and Hospice personnel has been outstanding. So many of my friends have taken time from their busy lives to let me know they miss me and send their supportive prayers. And, I’ve been blessed with an outpouring of love from Bob, my husband of 21 years. His appreciation of what I’ve been going through and how I’ve handled this trip through aging parent hell and his willingness to walk beside me through the difficult parts of this journey have kept me afloat numerous times when my little boat was at risk of going down from the weight of responsibility and turbulent emotions.

This is a journey I would never have willingly chosen. It has derailed me from my life and my business. I had the worst Christmas of my life. My feelings have ricocheted between profound sadness, fear, impotence, frustration, rage and numbness. I’m weary not only from the intensity of feelings I’ve been flying through and the physical demands of many trips back and forth to Kilmarnock, Virginia, but also from having to be the healthy, functioning “good brain” for Mom and John through this difficult transition.

This is my life right now.  I recall meaningful sayings from important places, such as, “One Day at a Time,” “This, Too Shall Pass,” and “Let Go, and Let God.”  I remember these sayings as I’m taking over management of Mom’s life and while I’m coordinating with my step-sister to arrange and maintain the best care for Mom and John.  We’re working hard to help them live with as much serenity and dignity as possible.

All this is to say that, for me, family is first.  I will not be able to be consistent with my online communications for some time.  But I will return when I can.  I long to return now.

2 thoughts on “Feng Shui Organizer Missing In Action

  1. Carmelita Scott

    Oh Debbie. My heart goes out to you. I feel your anguish. My 87-year-old mom (who lives 90 minutes away from me) has undergone a lot of transition in the last few years and the challenges of taking care of her are great. My mom has had 24 hour caregivers for the last two years and we couldn’t do this without them.

    In the last 6 weeks she has had four hospital admissions which were very difficult. We spent Christmas at the hospital with her, and now she is in a nursing home for a couple weeks of rehab. Although my role is a difficult one, I cherish it as I cherish my mom and don’t know how much longer I may have with her. She deserves the best of care and I am happy to do it. But yes, it is hard. All I can do is my best and lean heavily on the support and love and prayers from others.

    Your mom and stepdad are so fortunate to have you, Debbie. I can see that this transition to a new role in your parents’ lives has come very quickly for you and it’s hard to make those difficult decisions that are in the parent’s best interests when we are accustomed to them being able to care for themselves. I recently came upon this article about how to make those hard decisions and it really helped me to understand my role better. Perhaps it will help you as well:
    http://caroldodell.wordpress.com/2008/04/12/how-to-deal-with-a-stubborn-parent/

    My thoughts and prayers are with you in this difficult journey. Take all the time you need to take care of your parents. Don’t worry about the blog – your readers will be here when you are able to return.

    Reply
  2. Shawna

    I feel for you. Our Christmas not quite as bad as yours but not that unfamiliar…. spent looking at facilities with waiting lists to get in for Alzheimer’s secure care – and hope caregiver can hold out…..

    My post on it came out as – Zombie Apocalypse Is Here You Know
    http://sgchris.livejournal.com/

    Thank God for the information and services / help available now.

    Always Best Care Senior Services
    is also one along the lines of Visiting Angels that some places have….

    May this year be the year that discoveries are made to eradicate these awful diseases from everyone’s lives. Soon!

    I don’t think anyone would wish this heartbreak on their worst enemy.

    Reply

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