Category Archives: Self Care

Empower yourself! Fix broken things!

Broken things carry a very heavy weight energetically. For example, you may not be aware of

Fixing my arthritic thumb joint was empowering!

how heavy that leaky faucet is in your subconscious until you repair it and feel the relief of having it fixed.

I was reminded of how empowering it can be to fix broken things when I had surgery to address osteoarthritis in my right hand. For years I had been experiencing increasing aching pain at the base of both my thumbs. As the arthritis and pain progressed my mobility in my hands became more and more limited. I had to stop knitting. I had to stop using the track pad on my computer. I had to ask my husband to open jars for me. My hands became weaker and weaker. As those things happened I began to feel broken, powerless to do anything about it, frustrated, and old. The brokenness in my body negatively affected my sense of self, my belief in myself and my abilities. I was on a negative slide. Brokenness brings with it negative energies in many forms.

I was excited to learn that surgery could give me back full use of my hands. I’m now two weeks into recovery. Though my hand still has some dull pain and feels fragile, I have noticed that my sense of what is possible for me in the future is growing. Just addressing that one broken part of me has begun shifting from an “I can’t” energy to an “I can” energy. Why is that? Because I fixed a part of my body that was broken. I know my hand will no longer be deteriorating into debilitating pain. It is healing and will be strong again. If it will be strong, so will I.

I wasn’t consciously aware of the extent of the psychological weight caused by the progression of arthritis in my hand until I took action to address the problem and eliminate it. When I was feeling broken and powerless, my thinking and view of myself was contracting. When I took action to repair what was broken, my thinking and my view of myself began to expand. It manifested in feelings of optimism and joy. I began taking action to realize my intention to include more music and art in my life. I took a painting class, my first oil painting class since college. I rented an oboe and registered for classes to learn how to play it.

The more healthy and whole I am physically and psychologically, the more empowered I feel. The more empowered I feel the more likely I am to take positive action. What is broken in your life that if fixed would give you new life, motivation, inspiration and could lead to positive action on your behalf? What is your first step to fixing it? What’s possible if you do fix it? How will fixing it empower you to go for what you really want? 

Pleasure at Christmas Is My Priority

Years ago while working with an energy healer I learned that I have great

What brings you pleasure at this special time of year?

What brings you pleasure at this special time of year?

difficulty allowing pleasure. I was raised by two people who worked first, played later if they played at all. Hard work was revered in our house. Plus, when my parents’ marriage began to go downhill, working hard distracted me from my fear and sadness. I worked hard at school, at home, at work, in my private life, and at anything that mattered to me. It was always difficult for me to lighten up and have fun.

When I became aware of my challenge allowing pleasure I decided to do something about it. I started by intentionally lightening up and taking pleasure in the festivities of favorite time of year — the Christmas holiday season. It was a good place to start because it was a time of year that included many things I already loved: Christmas music, spending time with family and friends, baking sweets to give away, showing people I love them, and Christmas colors and decorations.

I deliberately simplified what I did to prepare for the holidays each year to lower my stress and make it possible to be more present to those aspects of the season that touch my heart — lights, music, warm connections with loved ones, familiar decorations. I became more mindful and discriminating about social events I would attend. I enjoyed activities I loved and eliminated those that seemed like work.

Now, when I think of the December and the holiday season my heart smiles. It’s a time of year when I give my hard-working, driven self a break. I see fewer clients. I ease up on my expectations of myself to be consistently productive, and I follow the lead of my heart.

Choosing to allow pleasure at the holidays has made it possible for me to be gentler with myself all year long. I am a first child, which comes with challenges like perfectionism, drivenness, high standards, and a harsh inner critic. I still have a long way to go toward balancing work and fun all year long. But, thanks to my annual pleasure fest in December, I am making progress.

Does pleasure (other than alcohol induced pleasure) even show up on your radar during the holiday season? If not, set your intention to experience some type of holiday pleasure each day of December no matter how busy you are. Make pleasure your focus this holiday season and reap the benefits all year long!

Dispel Christmas Pressure! Simplify!

“Are you ready for Christmas yet?” That is the subject of many conversations angel-564351_640among women at this time of year. I was thinking about that question today, and the perspective it anchors. It keeps the focus on the tasks that must be done before the deadline of December 25, like a race to the finish line. Just thinking about that quest creates feelings of pressure and even dread inside me. No wonder some people hate the holidays! It’s just associated with more work to do, not pleasure.

I have always loved the Christmas season. The season, not just the day — the music, the bright lights, the special foods, getting together with friends and family, showing my love and care with gifts and cards I send to those I love. However, I once was like so many people, running as fast as I could to that magic deadline, only to feel let down once I got there. Instead of enjoying the season, I was focused on completing tasks, worrying about whether I’d get everything done on time, and not having much pleasure or fun.

One day I woke up to the fact that the way I was doing Christmas made it impossible to be present to the possible joys of the season. I had a choice to make. 1) Keep doing what I was doing and continue to feel stressed, irritable and burdened. Or, 2) modify what I do each Christmas so I can have time and energy to be fully present for all the joys of the holiday season.

I chose option number 2. My focus is no longer on the deadline of December 25. It is on enjoying the traditions, the feelings, and the opportunities for meaningful connection all through December. This is what did I did to get off the autopilot of stressful Christmas preparations.

  • I stopped putting up a big tree (it took me a day to set up just the tree), and I now have three smaller trees that I keep decorated. All I have to do to put them up is to remove the plastic bag that covers them during storage.
  • I downsized the number and kinds of decorations I put out. I kept only those decorations for which I had a strong heart connection, and I eliminated annoying, difficult to put up decorations like candles in the windows. 
  • I reduced baking from several different types of cookies and sweets to
    img_2656

    Cracker Candy

    one very simple recipe that everyone loves.

  • For many family members I only give token gifts or gift cards instead of numerous gifts.
  • I pair boring tasks like addressing and writing notes in Christmas cards and wrapping presents with tasks I enjoy like watching a Christmas movie or a special TV program.
  • I stopped attending holiday parties I didn’t enjoy.

I still have a Christmas to-do list, but it’s not my main focus. It is no longer driving my mood. I keep my eye on and devote my energies to enjoying the pleasures of the season. I go to Christmas concerts, schedule time to connect with special friends, listen to Christmas music as I drive and work around my house, sit quietly in my decorated space. And, guess what? The tasks that I want to get done (gift giving, card writing, baking, decorating, etc.) get done with less stress, less rush and more pleasure.

What can you do to shift your focus from the pressured rush to the December 25 deadline to enjoying the special opportunities for connection and pleasure that are available during the whole holiday season? You do have a choice!

Get Unstuck: Exercise Works!

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Yoga helped me get unstuck!

I’ve been stuck in grief and low-grade depression since the death of my mother in July. It’s been very hard to muster the enthusiasm needed to promote my business. I knew that losing Mom after 5 years of coordinating her care as Alzheimer’s claimed her mind would derail me. But, I thought after a month or two I would be back on track. Not so. Add in normal fall seasonal affective disorder, and I have been moving at a glacial pace.

For many years I have walked regularly and done sit ups, push ups, and leg lifts at night before going to bed — minimal exercise. In an attempt to build strength and energy, Bob and I joined American Family Fitness, a gym near our home, 

Going to a gym has never been easy for my introverted self. But this time I approached the challenge with a new perspective. Instead of thinking of the gym as a place where I would demonstrate how out of shape I am and how much better others are, I viewed it as a place to reclaim my strength, my center, my confidence and feelings of well-being.

I started with a yoga class and an easy workout on machines. As expected, I was wobbly during yoga poses and my muscles screamed and let me know I had been neglecting them. I got breathless on the treadmill. However, almost immediately I felt better. It was as if some vital life force in me began moving again. Optimism returned. Enthusiasm returned. And, with those good feelings came a desire to write this blog, to get to work.

Keys to making this gym experience different than others:

  • I went in with no expectations for a high level of performance.
  • I viewed going to the gym as self-care and an activity to help me feel better.
  • I took relatively easy, meditative classes and started slow on the machines instead of pushing myself in high intensity classes and workouts.
  • I chose the kinds of exercise I like to do.
  • I viewed just showing up at the gym as a success.

The payoff: I’m moving again, feeling better, and being more productive!

Clutter Blocks the Rapture of Being Alive

“People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think that what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive. . . so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive.”

Joseph Campbell

“The experience of being alive . . .  so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive.” Those words really struck me as I was reflecting on my recent trip North to make a turkey dinner for my disabled brother, Mark.

Visiting Mark is always bittersweet. Several brain injuries have left him in need of 24 IMG_2637hour care. Earlier this year he suffered a major cognitive and physical decline following a bout with shingles and receiving the shingles vaccine. My heart hurts as I watch my sweet, strong, vibrant brother fade away into an invalid who has little control over the course of his life.

This trip, instead of putting my head down and jumping head first into the pain of the continuing loss of Mark, I said yes to Diane,  when she suggested that we take the train into New York City to see a Broadway show. For the hours that I rode the
IMG_3332train into the city, hiked up Broadway past lighted Christmas trees and all the sights of the busy city, and watched my first Broadway show, I was able to put the painful emotional and mental clutter of my life aside and be in the rapture of the having new fun experiences.

I work with people who have volumes of painful, paralyzing, physical clutter. My clutter, by comparison, is mental and emotional, and has limited my ability to let go and have fun. Going into New York City was an opportunity to separate myself from the clutter of fearful, limiting beliefs and sad feelings to just enjoy the pleasure of being IMG_3325alive and having new experiences. I left New York City wanting more. Not necessarily more Broadway shows, though that would be wonderful, but more relief from the clutter that blocks me from allowing myself new experiences and moments of joy.

Clutter, whether physical, mental or emotional, blocks you from experiencing the rapture of being alive. What can you do today to release those blocks? My friend, Diane, offered me support, encouragement, and a way to let go of my blocks for a wonderful evening of fun. What support do you need to to move forward to clear your clutter?

Clutter Clearing Can Be a Relaxation Technique

iStock_000002038361Small

Clear clutter and make relaxation possible.

There are so many options available for getting to a relaxed state these days. You can do yoga, massage, Feldenkrais, breath work, stretching, hot tubs, Healing Touch, Reiki, exercise, and meditation to name a few. I have experienced most of those options and they are all wonderful. But, when you’ve finished experiencing one of those techniques, is your house in better shape? No! And, when your house is cluttered is it easy to relax? No!

When you clear clutter you can create a relaxed state in several ways:

  1. With each item you get rid of you are are releasing a source of negative energy. As you eliminate negative energy, the overall balance of energy becomes more positive. As the energies become more positive, you begin to relax.
  2. Every item has an energy that talks to you. The more objects in your space, the more conversations you have going on at the same time. A room full of clutter just screams at you. Items with negative energy, like broken things and piles of unprocessed paper, scream the loudest. As you clear clutter you quiet the conversations. The quieter the space, the more relaxed you’ll be.
  3. When you eliminate things you no longer use or love, it’s much easier to organize what’s left. An organized space is a much more peaceful place than a cluttered space. When a space is peaceful, you can relax.
  4. Clutter clearing is a form of exercise. Exercise relaxes you!
  5. When you clear clutter you can think more clearly. When your brain is clear you can relax because you are less likely to make an error in judgment.

So, make clutter clearing a part of your self-care plan to ease stress and be more relaxed! You’ll feel better about the energy of your home as well as your own energy!

Holiday Food Prep: Love It or Lose It

Over the years I’ve listened to many women complain about all they have to do at the holiday

Cracker Candy

Cracker Candy

season. And, it’s very true that the lion-share of the work to make holidays happy days is left up to women. What I’ve had a hard time reconciling is many a woman’s belief that they are being held hostage by the expectations of others, that they have no control over how much they have to do.

In the baking/food prep arena, for example, some women think they have to keep making all the special dishes that every family member loves even though their family members do little to help lighten their mom’s load at this busy time of year. These women sacrifice their own sanity and enjoyment of seasonal activities to please often ungrateful family members–because it’s what she’s always done. And, some women continue to make baked goods and food items because they think that’s what’s expected or that it wouldn’t be Christmas without them.

I recommend a new approach in the area of food prep. Make those special dishes and baked goods that you enjoy making, that you have time to make without stress, and offer to teach family members to make those dishes or baked goods that they want that you don’t like making. Or, purchase comparable ready-made items to substitute for those that are a hassle to make or too time consuming to make.

I once spent many an hour baking a variety of cookies because I thought I “should.” By Christmas I was exhausted, and I’m not certain anyone really cared about all my creations. In a desperate attempt to simplify my schedule and enjoy Christmas more, I began limiting my baking to just one item, the one everyone loves the best, Cracker Candy. It just has 4 ingredients. One batch takes 20 minutes to make. I give it to friends, family and to say thanks to people who have helped me during the year. I love the process of throwing a batch together. I love the simplicity of ingredients and creating a luscious batch.

Can you simplify food prep during the holiday season? Give Cracker Candy a try!

Cracker Candy

Ingredients

2 sticks margarine (Fleishman’s original — other’s don’t work)

1 cup sugar

1 12oz. pkg semi-sweet morsels

1 pkg saltine crackers (1 of 4 that comes in a big box)

Do This:

  1. Preheat oven to 350.
  2. Use a cookie sheet with sides. Line it with tin foil.
  3. Line up crackers on cookie sheet. They should almost fill the sheet. Don’t worry about it if they don’t.
  4. Melt margarine and add sugar. Bring to a boil and boil for 3 minutes stirring constantly. Mixture should be frothy.
  5. Pour mixture over crackers to cover all cracker surfaces.
  6. Bake 8-11 minutes. Time needed will depend on how hot your oven is. Butter mixture should be a golden brown all over with small areas on the side beginning to get dark brown (burning!). If you don’t cook it long enough, it will be chewy.  If you cook it too long, it will burn. I know. I have done both!
  7. Remove from oven and immediately use wooden spoon to push all crackers back together (they drift apart while cooking).
  8. Pour semi-sweet morsels over crackers and spread with a spoon. The heat of the crackers will melt the chocolate so it will spread like icing.
  9. Refrigerate until cool.
  10. Break into pieces and enjoy! Beware! It’s addictive!

Get Charged! An Aid for Fatigue-Caused Clutter Challenges

Fatigue — the enemy of getting and staying organized. Fatigue often wins out over doing those

Get Charged Naturally!

Get Charged Naturally!

boring, repetitious tasks that must be done daily to maintain order in our homes and offices in order to prevent clutter. 

Our fatigue comes from life’s intensity, chronic stress, chronic busyness, insufficient rest, poor sleep habits, unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, too much responsibility, depression, etc. The list goes on and on. Fatigue is epidemic in our high striving culture. To survive, many people just crash when they get home. They do what they have to do at work, for their children and/or aging parents and to live up to outside obligations. But, when they get home they do the essentials, and maintenance behaviors like sorting mail, emptying shopping backs, hanging up clothes, picking up and cleaning up don’t routinely happen. And, consequently, clutter accumulates. 

I was recently reminded that one very real physical challenge that causes much of the fatigue we experience is adrenal fatigue. I say “recently reminded” because I have a history being aware and losing sight of the information that stress burns out the adrenal glands resulting in debilitating fatigue — until I too crash from fatigue.

My current crash sent me looking for relief AGAIN. I found a product that gave me immediate relief, at least temporarily. I’m so excited about my discovery that I want to share it with you. It could be just the jumpstart you need to get you up out of the fatigue ditch and back to daily clutter clearing for sanity’s sake.

It’s called Get Charged produced by The Republic of Tea, and is available in health food stores. No, it’s not another caffeine source. It’s made up of energizing herbs including ginseng and ashwagandha which aren’t addictive like caffeine. I experienced immediate benefits within a day or two — more energy, more optimism. I’m sharing this information with you because you too may benefit from this option. It could bring you some relief to the very real fatigue challenge that so many of us face every day.

Get Charged is not a miracle tea. It did not cure my adrenal fatigue. It is only one piece of the puzzle of addressing my chronic adrenal challenges. But, the tea made the fatigue less debilitating. I has given me enough relief to motivate me to seek more long-lasting options. And, it has helped me stay true to my commitment to stay organized and be productive. 

If you too struggle with chronic fatigue that shuts down daily clutter clearing, one option is to try Get Charged to address adrenal fatigue, a common cause of fatigue in our stressed out society. Do it before you’re sitting in a nightmare of your own making. If you’re already there, first get help for your fatigue. Then, get help to dig out and begin again. Living in clutter is a choice. Getting help for fatigue is one positive step that can get you moving and clearing.   

9 Elements of Success: Self-Care — Graduate Level

Eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise and getting enough sleep are the foundation of a iStock_000002038361Smallsolid self-care plan. Without them, your physical body won’t operate optimally which in turn affects your mental and emotional health. With that foundation in place you can expand your self-care in ways that feed you on many levels and motivate you to be an advocate for yourself and your well-being.

Following are some of my favorite ways to broaden and deepen your self-care plan:

  • Have realistic expectations of what it possible. You only have 24 hours in a day and you only have a portion of that time in which you have access to good brain power. Be realistic about what you can accomplish in that time. Otherwise, you set yourself up to constantly fall short of your expectations.
  • Make time to refuel. Pausing to take a break, relaxing and having fun are essential to refill your gas tank. Disengaging from work and deliberately stopping to rest your body and brain will make it possible for you to maintain good health, good relationships, access creativity, and work more efficiently and effectively. Running on empty for the sake of feeling in control of your “to do” list over time will make it impossible to be your best self. It will make all aspects of your life more difficult.
  • Control what you can. You can control your behavior, thoughts and attitudes, but you cannot control others. Trying to change the behavior of others is an exercise in futility that causes stress, angst and conflict in yourself and your relationships.
  • Look for the good, the positive in yourself, every person and every situation. With a commitment to a positive focus, you empower yourself to be part of solutions, not problems. Real change is only possible in the presence of positive emotional attractors.
  • Stop negative self-talk, the critical voice in your head. Negative thoughts pollute your thinking and make emotion management difficult. Replace them with curiosity about your behavior and appreciation of your strengths. Curiosity leads to self-awareness and the possibility of making different choices. Criticism keeps you small, ashamed and disempowered. Curiosity about your behavior and acknowledgement of your strengths lay the foundation for positive change.
  • Spend time with supportive, like-minded positive people. Their energy affects your energy.
  • Seek support from other people and groups when you feel overwhelmed, lost or off track from your positive focus and your goals.
  • Avoid spending much time in the presence of people who are toxic and negatively focused. Their energy affects your energy.
  • Maintain healthy boundaries. When a person has healthy boundaries they make careful choices about the commitments they make, taking into consideration their time, interests and availability. They know they cannot be all things to all people. They know how to say no to tasks that aren’t theirs to do and tasks they don’t want to do. People with healthy boundaries let other people solve their own problems. They offer support, but don’t take the problems of others as their own to fix.
  • Make decisions that take your needs into consideration. Be sure to include yourself in the equation. Consider what is best for you given your current reality, commitments, interests, and values. This is especially difficult for women who have been culturally programmed to put the needs of others before their own needs. Is it any wonder that many women are so tired, angry and resentful? Those are the consequences of not insuring that your own needs are met on a regular basis.
  • Maintain an organized home and/or office. The condition of your living and working spaces affects your energy, your ability to think clearly, your attitude and your productivity. Clutter creates negative energy and distractions that block good decision-making, getting things done, and maintaining a positive focus and good attitude. It engenders feelings of overwhelm, fatigue and hopelessness.
  • Develop a positive practice, an activity that feeds you with positive feelings and inspiration that helps you stay grounded and centered in the positive. This could include  yoga, meditation, journaling, spend in nature, daily spiritual reading, Tai Chi, walking your dogs, getting massages.

I could go on and on. There are so many possibilities for self-care. I’d love to hear about some of your favorite ways to take care of yourself. There is no absolute right way to do self-care. I liken it to a construction project, one that is on-going. Have fun assembling the pieces of your self-care plan! It’s a prerequisite to good health, good relationships and a good life!

9 Elements of Success: Self-Care — Laying the Foundation

Self-care. I’ve been writing and speaking about self-care for over two decades. I’ve been striving 

A good night's sleep is an essential building block of good self-care.

A good night’s sleep is an essential building block of good self-care.

to achieve it for just as long. I hold it as an ideal, but staying true to it has been difficult. It was a long, slow process for me to establish some good habits –eating well, getting a good night’s sleep, getting regular exercise, drinking plenty of water, and controlling my exposure to toxic people and negativity. 

If my clients are any indication, many people struggle to make self-care a priority. Almost without exception my organizing and coaching clients either are unaware of the value and true necessity of self-care, or have not made it a priority in their lives. Why is this? For one thing, productivity is revered far more than self-care in our culture. Often self-care takes a back seat to striving for success and managing life’s many activities and demands until there is a crisis. Heart attacks, diabetes, cancer, divorce . . . the possible outcomes of a lack of self-care, shine a light on the need for it.

Also, people who struggle with clutter and issues with productivity are usually working so hard to keep their heads above water that self-care never makes it on their radar. An overwhelming, harried, overly busy life is the breeding ground not only for clutter, but also for behaviors that actually cause health issues that could be prevented by self-care: over-eating, working late, and having no time or energy for exercise.

If you want positive change and a life of choice instead of crisis, reactivity and chaos, self-care must be part of your action plan. It really is not optional. It’s a necessity. Self-care is the foundation from which all change is possible. It is essential to generate the best brain power, best attitude, best energy and best results.

What is self-care? When Certified Organizer Coaches® were asked about their self-care in 2013,  most viewed self-care as regular exercise, eating well, and getting good sleep. Their priorities were right on the money! Those three practices are key essentials of good self-care and are what most people think of as self-care. They lay the groundwork to create the physical balance that makes possible good thinking and good emotion regulation. When they are in place, they create the physical, mental and emotional conditions needed to be able to thrive in all areas of your life. 

Starting with the big three, regular exercise, eating well, and getting good sleep, is a great place to start if daily self-care is not yet on your radar. Clients who practice those forms of self-care get immediate results not only in feeling better physically, but in effectively handling challenges, improved mental clarity, and accomplishing their goals. Conversely, when their self-care slips, and it will from time to time even for the most committed, everything is more difficult. Getting stuck is also much easier.

 

If you make the big three a priority in your life, you will find that you are better able to handle the rough waves of your life as they roll in. You will be less easily knocked down and carried away by the waves. When you do get knocked down and find yourself off track, you can more easily get back on your feet, supported by your self-care practices. With good self-care in place your confidence will grow making it more probable that you will be able to take on the risks of change necessary to achieve your goals and live a life in which you thrive instead of merely survive.

Make self-care a priority. The quality of every aspect of your life depends on it.

ADHD, Facebook, The Internet, and Sleep Problems

sleeping womanSleep is an essential component of self-care for people with ADHD. However, many people with ADHD have sleep challenges. They have great difficulty shutting off their busy minds so they can rest.

Almost every ADHD client I’ve coached has described having difficulty getting enough sleep. They stay up late despite having to get up early the next day to go to work or some other activity. They run on a sleep deficit which makes managing the symptoms of their ADHD much more difficult.

Many ADHD challenges (problems with executive functions that result in planning difficulties, difficulties getting and staying organized, difficulties managing impulsivity, a short attention span, and difficulties making decisions, etc.) can be attributed to having frontal lobes that are less active than people who don’t have ADHD. People with ADHD, therefore, have great difficulty getting their brains to cooperate when they need to concentrate and engage in and accomplish tasks. To jumpstart their frontal lobes they unconsciously seek stimulation in many ways. Checking Facebook, posting to Facebook, and surfing the web are stimulating activities. 

When I’ve explored what clients are doing prior to attempting to sleep, every one of them cited being on the computer or their phone engaged with the internet and/or Facebook. In effect they were stimulating their brains up until they shut their eyes, sometimes even after they had gotten into bed. Is it any wonder they were having difficulty getting to sleep? Their normally active ADHD brain’s sleep challenge was compounded by the mental stimulation of being on the internet or Facebook.

Facebook and other social media activities are seductive to the stimulation-seeking ADHD brain. Could refraining from that stimulation for an hour before bedtime make getting to sleep easier? Give it a try!

Be sure to notice how your brain reacts when you remove it’s pleasurable evening stimulation. The brain typically objects to change, and the ADHD brain, which tends to seek pleasure, may really object to the removal of pleasurable stimulation.  If that happens, notice it, acknowledge it as a normal response, but also notice what happens regarding your ability to get to sleep and the quality of your sleep. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to add getting adequate quality sleep to your ADHD self-care plan!

Self-Care and A New Definition of Competent

This post will make the most sense to those of you who never seem to be able to slow down newspaper-300x248and stop doing tasks to have a life of your own. That has become the norm for many of us these days. Instead of technology facilitating better time management and helping to increase leisure time, the exact opposite seems to have happened. We now can be accessed at any time of the day, and have more on our plates than ever before. There are so many possibilities out there. Our expectations of ourselves and our performance has never been higher and more unrealistic.

This year I made a New Year’s commitment to have a different kind of year from the overly busy, stressful years of the past. I wanted more rest, play, and lighthearted times. I have a long history of over-functioning and pushing myself beyond my physical limits. Not only was I running on empty, I was running on fumes trying to run my business, finish organizer coach certification, coordinate care for my mother who has Alzheimer’s and is in assisted living, oversee my disabled brother’s care in Connecticut, maintain a good marriage, and manage our household. I knew if I didn’t make some real changes I would eventually pay a hefty price with my health. 

When I began making changes, like avoiding my computer weekday mornings until after I had walked my dogs, had quiet time with a cup of coffee and reading books that feed my heart, soul and brain for 15 to 30 minutes, I felt wonderful. And, I also felt uncomfortable. Fortunately I’m working with Diane Thomson, a great coach, so I had the support I needed to work through my discomfort. Together we discovered that what was driving my compulsive doing was my value of competence and my need to do all I could to feel competent in every area of my life.

Following is what I wrote Diane as I was trying to make sense of my discomfort with slowing down.

“After our session I did some thinking about my blahs today. It occurred to me that perhaps part of the blah feeling is because I’m not running on adrenalin constantly. I’m now not getting high from urgency every day. What I’m feeling might really feel OK to a “normal” person who is not a compulsive doer. This feeling of going slower and more deliberately, instead of at warp speed to get as much done as possible, trying to jam way too much into the time available, feels unfamiliar. I think I may be equating unfamiliar with wrong, problematic, and bad.”

As a result of that awareness, I thought that it would be a good idea to re-write MY definition of competent. My old unconscious definition was something like “be reliable and do high quality work for as much time as possible during a day or until you drop dead or get sick.” Yes, I had been living by that unconscious recipe for disaster for many decades.

I was able to identify that the notion of self-care was completely missing from my original definition of competent. But, with new awareness, facilitated by coaching, I realized that I’m not being competent when I am being super productive at the expense of my health, rest, relaxation, and quality relationships. So, here is my new definition of competent. Competent is doing high quality work in amounts of time that also allow me to stop, breathe, rest, enjoy life, have fun and build/maintain quality relationships.

With my new definition of competent I’m moving into each day deliberately making space for me and my needs. I am getting more rest, having more fun, enjoying a deeper connection with my husband, and still being productive. In fact, when I work I am able to focus and get a more done in less time. Who knew that taking care of myself could improve my efficiency!

Yes, I still feel twinges of discomfort because I’m not driving myself as I once would have. I notice it and remind myself that change is hard, but that my choice is right. I believe getting off the fast track and onto the right track, a track that is respectful of me and my needs, is the only way to be able to make the biggest difference in this lifetime and drink in all the blessings and gifts this life has to offer.  

Coaching Accountability Leads to New Learning: A Chilling Story

One of the great benefits of coaching is the opportunity of accountability. In each session the iStock_000010338713Smallclient and coach strategize actions that the client commits to taking between sessions to help her make progress on achieving her goals. When the client returns for the next session the coach checks in with her about her action item. Whether or not she completed the task, there is always an opportunity for learning. It’s fascinating to see how the learning emerges for clients. Following is a particularly rich example of the type of learning that can happen when clients take action.

Sally (name changed to maintain confidentiality) had committed to “chilling” for 15 minutes every day. She knows how to work hard, but self-care and relaxing are difficult for her. She had been unable to make time for chilling at home, but was determined to do it on a trip to St. Thomas with her daughter and husband.

The first day Sally went to the pool with her family and lay on a lounge chair. She soon realized she had forgotten to bring a book or magazine. She had nothing to do. Sounds heavenly, doesn’t it? Not so for Sally! She felt extremely uncomfortable, like she was going to jump out of her skin. She looked around and noticed others doing nothing. They seemed just fine with relaxing. The contrast between the comfort of others around her and her discomfort made her aware that she really didn’t know how to relax and do nothing. She could see and feel how inexperienced and uncomfortable she is with doing nothing, with just relaxing.

Shortly thereafter she asked a staff member what people do on St. Thomas. The young woman responded, “Relax! Relax! Relax! Relax! Relax!” Given Sally’s memory of her difficulty relaxing at the pool, she took the young woman’s response as an indicator that she what had made her so uncomfortable at the pool, relaxing, was exactly what she was meant to do on this trip.

A day or two later Sally and her husband had some time to kill before a scheduled event. It was an excellent opportunity to practice chilling. They went to the lobby and hung out for four hours! When I asked Sally how she had managed that she told me that she had taken that staff member’s message to heart. Somehow it opened her up to have a different experience when there was nothing to do. Instead of twitching, she enjoyed watching people, nestling down in a comfy sofa, allowing her mind to wander and chatting with her husband. Her drive for doing was replaced by allowing rest, relaxation and just being with her loved ones in a lovely place. 

Sally’s commitment to chill led her to new awareness of how difficult it is for her to unplug and relax and to having a new, positive experience that motivated her to seek more such experiences. In our next coaching session Sally was more determined than ever to bring chilling into her time at home.

What new behavior would give you the opportunity to learn about yourself and open up the possibility for real change? Would having accountability offered in coaching make it more likely that you would take action and have a new experience? If you’re curious about this possibility, email me for a free 30 minute conversation about the opportunities of coaching for you.

Reduce Access to Technology for Better Sleep

sleeping womanPeople with ADHD have great difficulty shutting down their brains at night. Going to sleep can be a real challenge for their busy brains. Given that reality, I was taken aback when a coaching client who has ADHD told me she’d gone to bed at 9:30 a.m. the night before. And, consequently she woke the next day much more rested and ready to face the new day. Her habit had been to stay on the computer until late in the night so she could enjoy time to herself, thereby reducing her sleep time. As we do in coaching I asked what made that possible.

She told me she was listening to what her body needed. She also told me that she’d chosen not to go on the computer as was her habit, and that she’d turned the TV off because she didn’t want to stimulate her brain. It was as if she was speaking a foreign language. Just two weeks before she wasn’t talking with such self-awareness when we discussed her sleep habits. What had made the difference?

With more exploration I learned that she’d read this post online: “The Case Against Busy and the Art of Sitting Still” (http://www.fastcompany.com/3029388/work-smart/the-case-against-busy-and-the-art-of-sitting-still?partner=rss) by Jane Porter. The message in this article resonated with her so much that she consciously changed her nighttime routine.

The message of this article is so compelling that I wanted to share it with you. The author makes a case for the benefits of stillness and unplugging from technology. She advocates stepping out of  the “busy” norm to be able to access parts of yourself that go neglected when locked into the tyranny of busyness, much of which is generated by too much incoming through technology.

With awareness of what connectivity is costing you and understanding that participating in it is a choice, perhaps you too can unplug, reduce mental stimulation and get more and better sleep!

A New Definition of Competent

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What’s possible when you change your definition of competent?

I made a New Year’s commitment to have a different kind of year this year. I wanted more rest, play, and lighthearted times. I have a long history of over-functioning and pushing myself beyond my physical limits. Not only was I running on empty. I was running on fumes trying to run my business, finish Organizer Coach certification, coordinate care for my mother who has Alzheimer’s and is in assisted living, oversee my disabled brother’s care in Connecticut, maintain a good marriage, and manage our household. I knew if I didn’t make some real changes I would eventually pay a hefty price with my health. 

When I began making changes, like avoiding my computer until after I had walked my dogs and had quiet time with a cup of coffee and reading from books that feed my heart, soul and brain, I felt wonderful. And, I also felt uncomfortable. Fortunately I’m working with Diane Thomson, a great coach, so I had the support I needed to work through my discomfort. Following is what I wrote her as I was trying to make sense of my experience of slowing down.

“After our session I did some thinking about my blahs today. It occurred to me that perhaps part of the blah feeling is because I’m not running on adrenalin constantly. I’m not getting high from urgency every day. What I’m feeling might really feel OK to a ‘normal’ person who is not a compulsive doer. This feeling of going slower and more deliberately, instead of at warp speed to get as much done as possible, trying to jam way too much into the time available, feels unfamiliar. I think I may be equating unfamiliar with wrong, problematic, and bad.

I also thought that it would be a good idea to re-write MY definition of competent. My old unconscious definition was something like ‘be reliable and do high quality work for as much time as possible during a day or until you drop dead or get sick.’ Yes, I had been living by that unconscious recipe for disaster for many decades. 

The notion of self-care was completely missing from my original definition of competent. But, with current awareness, facilitated by coaching, I realize I’m not being competent when I get tons done at the expense of my health, rest, relaxation, and quality relationships. Competent can be doing high quality work in amounts of time that still allow me to stop, breathe, rest, enjoy life, have fun and build/maintain quality relationships.”

With my new definition of competent I’m moving into each day deliberately making space for me and my needs. I am getting more rest, having more fun, stopping before I’m exhausted, enjoying a deeper connection with my husband, and still being productive. In fact, these days when I work I am able to focus more quickly and easily, and I get a lot done in less time. Who knew that taking care of myself could improve my efficiency!

Yes, I still feel twinges of discomfort because I’m not driving myself as I once would have. I notice those feelings and remind myself that change is hard, but that my choice is right. I believe getting off the fast track and onto the right track, a track that is respectful of me and my needs, is the only way to be able to make the biggest difference in this lifetime and drink in all the blessings and gifts this life has to offer.  

What is your definition of competent?

Ground Yourself for Greater Productivity

DSCN0461In our rush, rush world that seems to run on urgency, it’s very easy to get ungrounded, to lose your focus, and in turn get stuck or spin in activity without awareness or purpose. In order to be productive you must be grounded in who you are and your current purpose.

When you are grounded you feel good, capable and equipped to handle whatever comes at you during your day. You are connected to yourself and a universal source of energy. You have confidence, you can make decisions and work effectively. When I’m grounded I do my best coaching, my best writing, my best speaking and my best work with hands-on clients. I operate from a firm foundation of my self-worth, trust in my abilities, and faith that things will work out for the best.

Many things can cause you to become ungrounded. Upon reflection of my episodes of becoming ungrounded, I’ve noticed that I can easily get knocked off center and disconnect from myself when I make mistakes, when I’m in transition (e.g. the transition from hands-on organizer to organizer coach who also does hands-on organizing), when I receive criticism or perceive judgement from others, when I’m fatigued, when I am in new situations, and when I’m not practicing good self-care (eating well, exercising, getting enough sleep).

When I’m ungrounded I feel anxious and fears plague me. My self-confidence is wobbly. I get breathless. I have difficulty focusing and identifying priorities for action. And, I sometimes get depressed. Being ungrounded is no fun!

Once I learned how to recognize when I am ungrounded I began to seek ways to reground myself. Following is a list of some of the ways I get back to center:

  • clearing clutter,
  • getting organized,
  • listening to music I love,
  • reading for information and inspiration,
  • making my space feel better by adding flowers and rearranging art,
  • spending time in nature,
  • weeding (having my hands in the earth),
  • walking my dogs,
  • participating in community with others who have similar challenges,
  • connecting with others who care about me,
  • seeking professional support (in networking, from colleagues, from consultants), and
  • getting coached (yes, coaches get coached too!).

Once I’m grounded again, I’m off and running! I’m focused. I have hope. I have clear intentions. I’m reconnected to myself and I’m productive.

Some people find themselves perpetually in a state of being ungrounded and struggling to be productive. If this describes you, it’s quite possible that you have a brain-based challenge that makes getting and staying grounded difficult (e.g. depression, anxiety disorders, ADD/ADHD). A consultation with a coach or therapist is the best way to determine if your productivity challenges are brain-based and would benefit from coaching or treatment by a therapist. If you suspect you may have a brain-based condition, take the first step by contacting me for a free 30 minute consultation to discuss that possibility.  Consider it necessary self-care to get grounded and be productive.

What knocks you off your center? When you are having difficulty being productive, you may be ungrounded. Notice it. Don’t judge it. Look at your current state with curiosity to identify the cause or causes of being ungrounded. Then find ways to reconnect with yourself, the positive essence of who you are and what really matters in your life. Get grounded and get productive.

High Drive Can Block Awareness

“Amy has pneumonia.” What!? My invincible sister-in-law, Amy, had pneumonia? I couldn’t believe it! I’d just seen her two days

The Price of High Drive

before and she seemed just fine. What happened was she’d finally tipped the scales from chronically doing too much to REALLY doing too much with no break.

Amy is the owner of a very successful preschool daycare program, and a dedicated wife and mother who almost always puts everyone’s needs before her own. Recently she’d not only been running her daycare, which requires anywhere from 60-80 hours of her time per week, and taking care of her home, family, and personal business, but within the last few months she’d developed plans to double the size of her daycare, gotten a loan, and searched out and worked with an architect and a contractor to renovate the space that would make expansion possible. That expansion also required that she and her husband move to a new home. She found a home, purchased it, and moved in. Because Amy has the organizer gene in her family, she also coordinated the move, did much of the moving of smaller items into the home, and did most of the unpacking and setting up the new house. Is it any wonder that Amy crashed?

Amy is a woman with high drive. There is no doubt about it. When I’d asked her how she’d been able to get so much accomplished in such a short period of time during our visit the weekend before she was diagnosed with pneumonia, she said, “I just keep going.” Her automatic response when there is a lot on her plate is to keep putting one foot in front of the other, making the next decision, taking the next action. And, she gets a lot done. But at what price?

When I spoke with her while she was recovering from pneumonia, and remarked that she’d seemed fine when I saw her, her response was, “I just kept feeling like something was off. And, I started feeling worse and worse, but I had no idea I was so sick.” Even then, she kept going. It wasn’t until her daughter said, “Mom, we’re going to the urgent care center,” that Amy had a clue that something was really wrong. Her drive to get things done, to do the responsible thing, had blocked her awareness that her body was sick and needed attention.

High drive is the trait associated with people who are successful in business and life, and is revered in our culture. But, as Amy’s story relays, it’s demands can block healthy awareness of your physical limits. It took something as serious as pneumonia to make Amy aware that she had to stop and realize what her drive was costing her.

If you recognize yourself in Amy’s story, which unfortunately I do, it’s time to pause and take stock of what your drive is costing you. Is it affecting your health, your mood, your relationships? Perhaps it’s time to take back control from the tyrant of high drive so you can not only avoid a nose dive into illness, but make space for more peaceful moments and pleasure in your life.

Yard Clutter Clearing Leads to a Valuable Lesson on Self-Care

What started as a determination to pull up all of the poison ivy that had invaded my flower beds ended up being a 2.5 hour marathon of pruning and weeding. Once I’d conquered that annoying invader of my gardens, a task I’d been avoiding for months, I felt ready for anything! I had no idea that that three leafed plant was blocking my motivation to do some serious work in my garden. Once it was gone, I had my garden back, and I could see so many possibilities for making needed improvements.

What most surprised me was a new awareness that my beloved butterfly bush needed a significant pruning. As I looked at it with its luscious bright purple tubular flowers, I noted that the weight of the branches was bending the bush almost in half. It looked like a burdened soul carrying a very heavy weight. Since feng shui has taught me that the energy of things around me affect my energy, like the off-putting energy of the poison ivy, I overcame my reluctance to cut off branches laden with flowers. I was all over that bush!

This past year I have been carrying some very heavy burdens, like caring for my mother who has Alzheimer’s. That bush reminded me of how I felt many times when I was juggling too many very weighty balls and feeling so weary. I definitely did not want anything in my yard or home to hold the energy of being burdened. As I chopped off more and more branches the bush began straightening up. When I was done, it was standing tall.

The lesson of the butterfly bush is that if I release some of what I’m carrying by saying no more often, lowering my sometimes unrealistic expectations, and asking for more help instead of trying to do everything myself, I too can stand tall, reaching for the sky instead of gazing at the ground.

What began as a determination to eradicate an unwanted plant ended up as a valuable reminder that I do have choices when feeling burdened by responsibilities. I can choose self-care and letting go. What obligations can you release today to lighten your load so you too can look up and see the sky?

Slow Down to Reach Your Goals

At the risk of putting a few of you off because of the religious reference, I offer you a lovely poem I found among my mother’s papers when I was clearing out her desk. It’s so interesting that these words were a comfort to my mother, that she too probably struggled with the never ending pull of things to do. Of course, she was a mother and that comes with the territory!

I hope you find these words give you permission to take your foot off the gas pedal and take time for more pauses, quiet and reflection. The best inspiration and guidance comes through in the quiet moments!

Slow me down, Lord.

Ease the pounding of my heart by the quieting of my mind.

Steady my hurried pace with a vision of the eternal reach of time.

Give me, amid the the confusion of the day, the calmness of the everlasting hills.

Break the tension of my nerves and muscles with the soothing music of the singing streams that live in my memory.

Help me to know the magical, restoring power of sleep.

Teach me the art of taking minute vacations–slowing down to look at a flower, to chat with a friend,

to pat a dog, to read a few lines from a good book.

Slow me down, Lord, and inspire me to sink my roots deep into the soil of life’s enduring values

that I may grow toward the stars of my greater destiny.

©1992 Creators Syndicate

Boundaries & Productivity

Today I coached a woman who began our session saying, “It’s been a wild week. I’ve really been spinning.” I typically hear reports of spinning from clients who have ADHD. Since I’m fairly certain this client does not have that brain based challenge, I was curious about her spinning. Was the catalyst of her spinning thoughts and feelings on the inside or was she spinning in reaction to things happening on the outside, happening with people or events in her life.

When I asked her to describe her spinning, when it started, how she experienced it, it was revealed that the spinning began when she’d gotten drawn into the drama of several family members, people who led chaotic lives filled with challenges of their own making. Her intention had been to be a source of support, but in the process she was adversely affected by their unpredictable behaviors and unintentional disregard of her needs and schedule. She began in spin in anxiety, lost sight of her goals, and lost a whole day that could have been spent getting important tasks done.

My client values being responsible and keeping her word. When caught up trying to meet the needs of others who don’t share the same values, she lost her center and begin to spin in response to their spinning. Together we identified a need to set clear boundaries with family members, letting them know under what conditions she is willing to help and saying no to requests that will disrupt her life and could send her spinning again.

What my client sacrificed when reacting to the needs and chaotic conditions of loved ones was her own ability to stay grounded and be productive. She lost a day of work and her peace of mind. How is your productivity being affected by the chaotic lives of others? What boundaries do you need to set?

Physical Self-Care: A Priority for Successful Clutter Clearing

When I greeted my client today and asked how she was doing she told me she was OK. . . . . In other words she wasn’t really OK. When I inquired further she told me she hadn’t had much to eat today, that she felt tired. We talked about how to proceed with our clutter clearing project, given how she was feeling. Once we’d agreed on our approach and focus we got to work.

This client is a busy inner-city elementary school principal. She is very capable and it’s not unusual that she presents at our sessions as tired and stressed. What was unusual was her admitting that she didn’t feel well. I kept that in mind as I worked with her. About 30 minutes before the end of our two hour session she complained about feeling hot and was not experiencing a hot flash. She decided that a snack might help her feel better, and rather than snack while we continued to work, she chose to take a break and eat a yogurt and drink some water in an adjoining conference room. It was VERY unusual for this client to stop working altogether because she is all about getting things done. Clearly something was not right!

For the next 10 minutes I worked independently to help move her along despite her need to stop. When I got to a point that I could not proceed without her input I joined her in the next room. There we talked about her symptoms and the possible causes of her discomfort: dehydration, a blood pressure drop, a reaction to food she had at lunch, and a blood sugar drop. When I informed her that you can become dehydrated after 15 minutes of concentrated work, she drank several additional bottles of water. The more water she drank, the more she perked up and she eventually felt much better.

Why am I sharing this with you? Because her behavior reminded me that self-care is an important part of successful clutter clearing. Following are several ways you can ensure that you arrive at that challenge as your best, most empowered self:

  • Be well rested.
  • Make sure you have good fuel for your brain–preferably some protein and fresh fruits or vegetables. Avoid simple carbohydrates like sugar and wheat-based products.
  • Be well hydrated and plan to sip water while you work to avoid dehydration.

Your body and your brain are tools that need to be in the best possible shape to tackle the challenging process of decision-making involved in clutter clearing. If your body or your brain shut down, you must stop. Make attending to your physical self-care a priority any time you plan to clear clutter.

Difficult Times, Winter Contraction

You may have noticed that I haven’t been posting with my usual regularity. Once again I have been hijacked by family challenges. I recently had to move my mother from out of town to an assisted living facility closer to me, which in itself was a major feat given my mother’s resistance, her dementia and some interference from another well-meaning family member. Then, there has been a time of adjustment for Mom which has required a lot of support from me and much time spent to make sure she has the best life possible in her new home.

At times like this, when emotions are running high and energy is running low, I have had to pare back what I do to the bare minimum so I can survive the current storm. And, family comes first.

Unfortunately at stressful times like this I find it very difficult to write. Writing takes a kind of reflection and focus that are just not possible when I’m doing all I can to stay afloat with my personal life and my business. So, please accept my apologies for being absent for extended periods of time during the last few months. I am sure that once I reach a new equilibrium I will be back with many new insights to share. I look forward to writing some articles about what I’ve learned from my recent experience helping my mother transition to assisted living.

Rest and Watch Productivity Soar

Yesterday I had surgery to remove a basal cell skin cancer on my face. I had doctor’s orders to rest so my incision could heal properly. I used that order to give myself permission to stop doing and start resting. Isn’t it sad that it takes a doctor’s order for me to stop and take care of myself?

I indulged in reading a novel most of the day. From time to time I’d feel the twinge of “you should be using this time to get some writing done,” but for most of the day I ignored it. At 5 p.m. when I needed a break from my book, I picked up my laptop and checked my email. Then I wrote an organizing tip, 2 blog posts and reviewed a stack of speech evaluations and entered about 40 emails into my database.

The learning? If I allow myself to rest, I have better mental clarity than if I keep limping along at half speed. If I allow myself to rest, my productivity soars!

Hmmmm. . . . .now, how to keep myself from going back to autopilot of work, work, work all the time without the doctor’s help?

© 2012 Clutter Clearing Community | Debbie Bowie

“Author, Organizing Expert and Feng Shui Practitioner, Debbie Bowie, is a leading authority on clutter clearing to attract more of what you want in life. If you’re ready to clear clutter and move your life forward, get your FREE TIP SHEET, “Feng Shui Tips for Instant Success” at http://www.clutterclearingcommunity.com.

Why People Get Sick-Teleseminar 3/29

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear a new perspective about illness, its causes and solutions! It could be a turning point in reclaiming your health!

America is rampant with disease and illness. More women than men are sick; we suffer from cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, metabolic syndrome. We are obese, depressed, anxious, lonely, and tired-really, really tired. What is behind all the disease? Why are we so sick? Bronwyn Lewis tells her own story of illness and recovery, linking illness to mind, body and spirit. She explores how emotions, responses to life situations and the environment affect our health.

Date: March 29, 2011

Time: 8:00-9:00 p.m. EST

Cost: $27

Registration: http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=9lizjscab&oeidk=a07e3gy3prjcc95b505

Presenter: Bronwyn Lewis, MS, FNP, Board Certified Family Nurse Practitioner. She practices Preventive and Energy Medicine with a special emphasis on health and wellness.

Ms. Lewis earned her Bachelor of Science Degree in nursing from Virginia Commonwealth University/Medical College of Virginia in 1998, furthering her education at that august institution with a Master’s in Nursing with a special concentration in family practice in 2001.

In 2008, Ms. Lewis completed a fellowship in Anti-Aging and Regenerative & Functional Medicine from the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine in conjunction with the Institute of Functional Medicine. That same year she also obtained her certification in Quantum Touch/Healing, and in 2010 she became certified in Sign Language of the Soul. Energy healing/Medicine is an essential aspect of her work with clients and, as such, has become a staple of her practice.

“I believe firmly that you are what you think, eat, and believe.
“I believe that there is a Universal Oneness, that all things are related in some way.
“I believe there is a divine spark (light and love) within each of us which is permeated and nourished by spiritual energy and guidance.
“I believe that true healing changes your soul, and is about much more than getting rid of symptoms, medications or having surgery. Soul Healing is self love that begins the work of healing.
“Cherish, therefore, all aspects of yourself from your heart… not your mind.”

Clutter Clearing Is a Self-Care Technique

There are so many options available for getting to a relaxed state these days. You can do yoga, massage, Feldenkrais, breathwork, stretching, hot tubs, Healing Touch, Reiki, exercise, and meditation to name a few. I have experienced most of those options and they are all wonderful. But, when you’ve finished experiencing one of those techniques, is your house in better shape? No!

When you clear clutter you can create a relaxed state in several ways:

  • With each item you get rid of you are are releasing a source of negative energy. As you eliminate negative energy the overall balance of energy becomes more positive. As the energies become more positive, you begin to relax.
  • Every item has an energy that talks to you. The more objects in your space, the more conversations you have going on at the same time. A room full of clutter just screams at you. Items with negative energy, like broken things and piles of unprocessed paper, scream the loudest. As you clear clutter you quiet the conversations. The quieter the space, the more relaxed you’ll be.
  • When you eliminate things you no longer use or love, it’s much easier to organize what’s left. An organized space is a much more peaceful place than a cluttered space. When a space is peaceful, you can relax.
  • Clutter clearing is a form of exercise. Exercise relaxes you!
  • When you clear clutter you can think more clearly. When your brain is clear you can relax because you are less likely to make an error in judgment.

So, make clutter clearing a part of your self-care plan to ease stress and be more relaxed! You’ll feel better about the energy of your home as well as your own energy!