Tag Archives: ADHD-friendly

An ADHD-Friendly Strategy to Be Productive

Initiating tasks and sustaining attention and  effort to a completion point are

The reward for progress!

The reward for progress!

very difficult for most people with ADHD, particularly if a task is uninteresting, boring, or repetitious. Consequently people with ADHD often live surrounded by numerous unfinished tasks.

At Adventures in ADD, a local meetup group, I learned a great strategy for getting things done that is designed to be ADHD-friendly. ADHD symptoms occur because the pre-frontal cortex of a person with ADHD is under-stimulated, resulting in executive function deficits. Consequently people with ADHD seek stimulation in order to fully engage their brains. Their brains are stimulated by fun activities, newness, crises, conflict and endeavors that are interesting to them.

The woman (I’ll call her “Edna”) who shared her strategy for getting things done probably did not know the neurobiological explanation for her productivity challenges. However, she knew she got bored easily and would likely bounce away from tasks when they were not interesting. Taking that information Edna developed the following strategy.

Edna identifies four or five different tasks she needs to get done. She works on one task until she gets bored (about 10-15 minutes). She then stops and rewards herself with a short period of time working on a jigsaw puzzle. She really loves putting puzzles together. Then she moves on to another task for 10-15 minutes followed by another puzzle break. Working in this way she gets work done on each of the tasks.

Edna is able to sustain effort and interest in working on her tasks because she has limited the time she spends on any one task and thereby avoids the ADHD tendencies to get bored easily, to get overwhelmed by the enormity of a task and to bounce away from a task to seek something more interesting and fun. She also deliberately provides what her brain craves — fun! She is willing to work for puzzle time! And, she makes progress on four or five tasks.

A strength of people with ADHD is their creativity and willingness to think outside the box. This strategy is evidence of both! Thanks, Edna!