Tag Archives: brain

Your Home Office Is the Brain of Your Home

Home offices are rarely treated with the respect they deserve. They often become dumping grounds for everything paper and more. When you consider that, at the very least, your home office is often the administrative and financial center of the home, you would think that they’d all be in tip top shape. But, they’re not. In fact, most of those I’ve seen are not. Why is that?

Here are some possibilities:

  1. That room may accurately reflect your relationship with your financial situation.
  2. It could reflect that the room was never set up for optimal functioning, either because you did not make time for the set up or because you really didn’t know how to set it up.
  3. The home office may accurately reflect your aptitude for organizing paper.
  4. The home office may be a reflection of your inability to be disciplined about doing tasks that are detailed, boring and time-consuming.
  5. Perhaps you don’t have a grasp on the connection between the condition of your home office and your financial well-being and peace of mind.
  6. You have a very full plate, and “tending” to the home office requires more mental energy than you can muster on a regular basis.
  7. Maintaining an orderly, clutter-free home office simply is not a priority.

Home offices also often have the unfortunate fate of being multipurpose rooms. They are often the leftover bedroom used for housing many functions like bill-paying, records storage, gift-wrapping center, sewing room, guest room and play room. As a multipurpose room, its significance as a hub for financial and administrative management for the household is often diminished. Plus, setting up and maintaining order in a multipurpose room is much more challenging than having a room devoted to household paperwork and finances.

Where to begin? The fate of the home office starts with understanding its importance relative to other rooms in the house. If you run a business from a home office, its significance is apparent. But, if your home office is just “paper central” (a place to store papers and pay bills), plus a few other functions like the gift-wrapping center and guest room, it’s harder to get clear about its purpose.


Perhaps this reminder will help: THE HOME OFFICE IS THE BRAIN OF THE HOME.
Let me repeat that again: your home office is the brain of your home. It is the place where essential information is stored relating to finances and running your household (and your life!).  Like your brain, when it is organized and up to par, you can handle whatever life throws at you. If your brain is foggy and unfocused, it’s difficult to make decisions and navigate life smoothly. So too with the home office. A cluttered, messy home office not only radiates negative energy, but presents problems when you need to lay your hands on important records in a timely fashion.

So your first step in creating a home office that you enjoy is to shift your mindset. Start thinking about your home office as the brain of your home . . . focused, clear, and open to receiving new opportunities (including financial growth!).

Task Management: Setting the Stage for Productivity

02_09_12_BizArticle_Fotolia_7316209_XS-225x300Last night I returned to my desk after a full day. I really wanted to write a blog post, but my brain was tired and I knew it was not capable of doing any creative work. So, instead I went through my email, responding to clients, friends and family members, deleting unimportant emails. I knew that a full inbox would be both anxiety provoking and distracting if I ignored it and did what I really wanted — to eat dinner and relax in front of Dancing with the Stars. 

Looking back at how I spent my time last evening, I realized that what I instinctively did was clear the decks to make writing possible today. In so doing I felt lighter when I finally turned off the light and headed for the kitchen. I was up to date. There was nothing niggling at me while I rested. And, here I am, writing.

When your brain isn’t capable of accomplishing a challenging task on your to do list, you have a choice. You can stop and escape to more pleasurable tasks that are not associated with your goals. Or, you can shift to tasks that require less brain power, but that when completed set the stage for accomplishing the more difficult task.

Working with Your Brain to Get Things Done

Male human head with skull and brain in ghost effect, side view.Getting things done rarely happens in a straight line. What you are able to accomplish at any given time is dependent on your brain state. When my brain is rested after a good night’s sleep, it is in optimal condition for doing my hardest work like writing newsletters, reports and blog posts, designing speeches, and making important business decisions.

After several hours of intense focus, my brain gets weary and it’s time to shift to lighter tasks like answering emails, scheduling clients, making phone calls. After a short break from intensity I am often able to again focus on more difficult tasks. By mixing things up, shifting from intense, difficult tasks to easy tasks and back again, I’m able to make the most of my time and my brain.

Here’s an example of how I recently worked with my brain to have a very productive day. I first did 4 hours of intense work which depleted my brain power. Then I ran an errand that took me through the country and took minimal brain power. The change of scene and exposure to the beauty of the countryside was rejuvenating. When I got home I was motivated to clear off my desk of several small tasks that were floating and distracting me–mailing a check, scheduling a client, etc. Once my desk was clear and my brain rested, I was able to tackle the difficult task of putting together a speech. I had energy and I had clarity.

When is your brain working at its best? Make the most of that time by tackling your most challenging tasks. But, don’t stop there. Remember, you can keep being productive if you shift to easier work or take a short break instead of stopping  altogether. Then returning to more difficult tasks may be possible. Honor your brain’s energy to make the most of your time and get more done.