Tag Archives: clutter clearing

Clutter Clearing Challenges in Retirement

“I had planned to clear all kinds of clutter once I retired, but I can’t seem to get it done.” This is an all too common lament of people who retire with intentions to reclaim order and peace in their homes. They are baffled by their inability to take action and achieve their goals. There are several reasons why clutter clearing doesn’t happen.

  1. Lack of schedule structure — Your life while you were working was structured around your work hours. You knew when you were obligated and when you had free time to get things done. Knowing you had limited windows of time to work around the house could have served as motivation to get things done. In retirement, unless you are working part-time, you may not have activities that create a regular schedule for you. With no regular schedule it’s much easier to put off doing tasks, particularly tasks that are difficult, seem overwhelming, and taxing. It’s easier to float along and do more pleasurable activities.
  2. Lack of urgency — Often there is no compelling reason or deadline to provide you with the sense of urgency that can be a catalyst for clutter clearing. Your schedule is open. Your timeline is open. Again, it’s very easy to just drift along putting off clutter clearing.
  3. ADHD — If you have ADHD or think you have it, your ADHD could be part of the problem. People with ADHD procrastinate doing jobs that aren’t interesting, fun, new, aligned with their passions, or in some way bring them pleasure. Clutter clearing is usually complicated and therefore difficult. It can engender feelings of shame and overwhelm, both of which shut down the ADHD brain. If you have a lot of clutter, clearing it is a long-term project which highlights ADHD difficulties with sustaining awareness, attention, effort and interest.

Ok, now you know some reasons why clutter clearing isn’t happening. Following are some options to help you achieve your goal of clearing your clutter once retired:

  1. Structure your time — Mark your calendar with blocks of time for your every day activities. Then add specific times to clear clutter. Make sure that you start with small, doable blocks of time (15 minutes to 60 minutes).
  2. Create urgency — Look for activities that you can schedule that will push you to clear clutter. For example, to get clutter clearing done in your dining room, schedule a special family dinner that requires that you use the dining room. Getting ready for the dinner will motivate you to make the space presentable for your guests. Resist the urge to just move your clutter to another location. 
  3. Create accountability — Get an accountability buddy, someone who is supportive of your efforts to clear clutter. Let your accountability buddy know what you plan to clear and when you plan to do it. Ask that person to check in with you to ask about your progress. It’s easy to blow off your own plans to clear clutter, but much harder to do when you commit to doing it to another person. 
  4. Get support — Ask a helpful, non-judgmental friend or family member to be with you while you clear clutter. Their mere presence can make it much easier to focus on the task at hand and take action. Plus you will transform a dreaded onerous task into a social event.
  5. Get professional help — A coach or professional organizer can help you get your clutter clearing done. Coaching with an organizer coach can help you identify what makes it so hard for you to clear clutter, provide information about how to do clutter clearing on your own, and also offer accountability. A professional organizer will work side by side with you to get the clutter clearing done. Professional organizers can get clutter clearing done four times faster than you are likely to be able to do it on your own.

Clearing clutter is possible when retired when you add structure to your time, set a deadline to create a sense of urgency, have someone to provide accountability, get support and/or get professional help.

Clutter clearing begins with a single step. If you’ve been stuck for some time and are frustrated by your inability to make clutter clearing happen despite using my first four suggestions, it’s time to consider hiring a professional. Schedule a free 30-60 minute phone coaching session with me to explore options for assistance.

The Five-Step Clutter Clearing Process

Clearing clutter is a complex process that can be difficult for even the

Clutter clearing, you too can do it!

most determined and intelligent person. How do you start? Where do you start? How do you keep going? Below are 5 steps to help you get started so you can experience success and be motivated to keep clearing.

1 Remember that doing something is better than doing nothing. What you do may not produce stunning results quickly, but doing any clearing shifts energies in a positive direction. 

2 Set a small goal for yourself. For example, plan to work for ten minutes. Set a timer and go to work. When the timer goes off, stop. Most of us can work for ten minutes. During that time do whatever is easiest to create some new order. Throwing away trash is usually easy. Clearing off a table might be easy. Finding a bag full of things to give away might be easy.

3 Start with the biggest items in the space you are clearing. Check the energy of big things. Ask yourself, “Do I love this?” If you have no special emotional attachment to the item, ask yourself, “Do I use this?” If the answer is “no” or “not in the last year”, consider losing it.

Moving big items allows you to see and feel yourself making progress and will motivate you to keep clearing. 

As soon as you decide to eliminate an item, remove it from the space, preferably by placing it just outside the door. It’s not a good idea to pause in the evaluation process to take the item much further than outside the door, because you risk getting sidetracked doing something else.

Removing the item from the room releases the energy that the item was holding. That released energy is then available to use as you continue making decisions about what to keep and what to release. The bigger the item, the bigger the energy release that is then available to you.

As you make decisions and move things out of the room, your energy will also increase, and making decisions becomes easier. Your brain begins to generate creative new ideas about what you can do in your space.

When you find that removing things from the room is getting difficult because of the quantity of items outside the door, stop sorting. Reward yourself by taking those items to their respective locations. DO NOT stop to reorganize the new location, even if you cannot easily put things away. Just leave items in the areas where they belong and make a mental note that the area needs your attention at a later date. Then, return to your project.

4 Congratulate yourself on your success. That sounds silly, doesn’t it? Some of you are thinking, “So, I did ten minutes of clearing in a house that needs ten weeks of clearing. What’s the big deal?” The big deal is that you made a plan to clear and kept it. You got started. Remember, every bit of clearing helps. And, if you don’t stop and feel the good feelings that come from the accomplishment of the work you’ve done, how are you going to motivate yourself to continue? It’s a head game. Play it!

5 Schedule your next clearing session, preferably sooner rather than later. Repeat the process. All progress makes a difference as long as you aren’t creating more chaos between clearing sessions than the amount you cleared.

It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? If that’s the case, why do people avoid decluttering? How do their spaces become nightmares right before their eyes? The fact that something sounds simple doesn’t make it easy to do. Clutter clearing involves making so many decisions. You not only need to decide what to keep and what to pitch, but also where to start and what to do with all your things as you work. It can be a great logistical challenge with the potential for distraction everywhere.

When I work with clients, part of my job is to keep them from running away. Even though I am in charge of the process and of making it easier for them, they are still affected by the way the space feels and by the enormity of the decision-making process. Your job is to keep yourself clearing despite the urge to run away.

The Konmari Method: Not a Magic Bullet!

51mf3u-jpal-_sx348_bo1204203200_Marie Kondo’s book, The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, has been the all the rage for the last two years. I’m guessing it caught on because people were fascinated and hungering for information about how to rid themselves of clutter forever. Wouldn’t that be nice! Or, perhaps the idea that tidying up could be magical and not a dreaded boring task was appealing.

Unfortunately, the only way to rid yourself of clutter forever is to have a highly effective, committed staff that follows you everywhere cleaning up and clearing out behind you or to be dead. As we move through life, we create clutter. The only way I know to live somewhat clutter-free is to make daily clutter clearing a priority along with several larger clutter clearing sessions per year.

Not only was I initially very put off by the suggestion that it is possible to clear clutter forever, I also had a problem with Ms. Kondo’s insistence that everything should be cleared out at once. Having worked as a professional organizer who has cleared clutter for almost 20 years, I have learned that the human brain wears out after an hour or two when making decisions once after another. Going through an entire house can take weeks or even months for most people. It is an enormous task!

Clutter clearing is all about making decisions. The idea that people are capable of working hour after hour, day after day to clear clutter not only is an impossibility (unless a team of people are doing the clearing), but it is a recipe for exhaustion and failure.

I also struggled with the sorting method proposed in Ms. Kondo’s book. At one point she suggested that a person’s closet be emptied onto the floor and clothes from other parts of the house be added to the pile. Then the sorting would begin and continue until all the clothes were sorted.

First, piling all the clothes in one place is a recipe for overwhelm. Seeing all the clothes at once would shut down most of my clients’ brains, especially those with ADHD. Also, it really isn’t necessary to empty closets when clearing them out. In fact, it’s much more efficient to leave all clothes in the closet, except for any that are on the floor, and pull out only those that a person no longer wants.

Finally, it is highly unlikely that even a person who is highly focused and motivated would be able to stay engaged in the sorting process until that enormous job was done. When exhaustion sets in, the brain melts down. When the brain is done, people quit clearing clutter. That would leave a big pile of clothes in the middle of the bedroom, a pile that would be much harder to get back to than it was to work on it the first time.

With all that said, I really liked the feng shui feel of the book. The way she looked at possessions was almost referent. Plus, she linked quality of a person’s life to the condition of their environment. Feng shui teaches that what you have in your space affects what happens in your life.

I can see all my shirts at once! No MIA shirts!

I can see all my shirts at once! No MIA shirts!

My favorite part of the book, however, was the section addressing how to fold clothes for maximum visibility. Using her suggestions I have totally transformed my sock and nightgown drawer and my shirt drawer using her methods. I feel proud and happy every time I open one of those drawers. Everything is so neat, organized and visible.

No, you can’t banish clutter forever. There are no magic bullets. But, you can improve the condition of your space by clearing clutter every day.

Clear Clutter: Donating Items Pays Off

Donate quickly to attract more good in your life!

Donate quickly to attract more good in your life!

It seems like donating items you no longer love, need or use would be a simple process. Just drive to the closest charity of your choice and drop off your stuff, right? I wish!

In particular, many people who have a difficult time letting go of things want to find just the right person or place to donate their former treasures. What they don’t realize is that having to find the best place for everything adds a complexity to the process that is time consuming and often ends up being a barrier to donating anything.

For years I have advocated to clients and participants in my educational seminars that they donate items quickly and as easily as possible trusting that their things will end up with just the right person. For example, Goodwill is five minutes from my house. All my donations go to good will.

I have also recommended that people consider donating items without making itemized lists to claim tax deductions. Making that list is another step, is tedious (I’ve never been able to make myself do it!), and because it’s an easily procrastinated task it is another potential barrier to getting things out of your space.

I gave up getting receipts from Goodwill years ago. I view my donations as a form of community service. I also believe that what you put out there will come back to you in some form. For example, I recently rented a car to visit my disabled brother. I need a car bigger than my tiny Honda Fit because Mark’s leg doesn’t bend at the knee. A van would be ideal, but the rental cost is prohibitive. Therefore, I made a reservation for a standard car with the hope that Mark would fit in it. When I picked up the car I explained what I needed and why, and to my surprise  was offered a van for the cost of a standard car.

I believe that by being generous and freely giving away things I no longer love, use or need that I attract generosity in others. The van was my good will coming back to me.

You will not experience the benefits of clutter clearing until your donations are out of your space. Make donating items a quick and easy process to attract more good into your life.

Bedroom Clutter Clearing: Live Within Your Closet

I was raised with parents who were not accumulators of material things.  I Home office closet_Anever saw clothes hanging from brackets attached to the outside of closets or scads of toiletries strewn across a bathroom counter.  So, in my early days of working as a professional organizer I was really unprepared for the quantities of clothes and other belongings that spilled from closets, drawers and cabinets.

Feng shui teaches that everything has energy and the energy talks to you. 

Well, when things that really belong in the privacy of a closet are hanging outside the closet, they talk to you!  In fact, if there are very many of them on the loose, they scream at you.  A peaceful bedroom can be quickly transformed to a noisy crowd when clothes no longer fit in closets and drawers.  That noise will interfere with getting good sleep which will affect your productivity, and over time, your health.

What do I mean by talk to you?  Things get their energy from their color, the memories associated with them, their materials, textures and design.  When something is out in the open all those components of it are visible and chatting away. 

What to do?  Make a commitment to live within your closets, drawers and cabinets.

Don’t accumulate more than you can comfortably house in the storage containers available to you. You can do that by regularly clearing out items you no longer love or use.

“But my closets are so small,” you say.  Get a wardrobe!  Move to a house with bigger closets!  What is more important — all those clothes, toiletries, gadgets, etc. or a peaceful home where it is really possible to get quality sleep?

Clear Clutter to Manage Grief

My mother is dying. She has been in the process of dying for more than threeIMG_0634 weeks. Her death is inevitable. When Mom will leave is uncertain. As you might imagine, I am swimming through a sea of feelings. My relationship with my mother has been precious. She was my best friend, a constant source of love and support. Her passing will leave a huge hole in my life.

How am I coping? I’m clearing clutter. When my emotions run high, I clear clutter. I am able to care for Mom and make sure she is comfortable and getting good care. However, I am utterly powerless about when she will actually die. There is no distinct deadline to this period of great pain and sadness. That leaves me feeling out of control and powerless.

When I feel out of control, I clear clutter. Clearing clutter is a process I can control. It is concrete and I get tangible results immediately. I am also aware that as I clear clutter, I am shifting energies from negative to positive. In so doing, I increase the probability that I will be able to better manage my feelings of grief and make good decisions as this sad journey comes to its ultimate conclusion.

What am I clearing? I am clearing things from Mom’s room that are no longer of use to her in her current state. Feng shui teaches that the best way to create change is to move things and to live with only those things that are in alignment with who you are in the present moment. Most things are no longer relevant for Mom.

Yes, I have had a twinge of guilt about whether it’s amoral to clear out things before Mom has actually died. I got over that feeling by reminding myself that Mom’s passing could actually be easier for her if she’s not anchored in her current state by the negative energies of physical belongings that no longer serve her.

I am also selfishly clearing because I know if I do the clearing in small increments now her death will be easier to handle emotionally. I won’t be left with an enormous painful clutter clearing project when I’m grieving.

I’ve seen what happens to the homes of adult children when they have cleared out parents’ homes post-death in the midst of their grief. Things that belonged to their loved one hold the energy of the loved one and the energy of the loss. They avoid making decisions about what to keep and what to get rid of because it hurts to do so.

Consequently they take home enormous quantities of things that may or may not be significant to them. They then cram those things into their attics, garages, utility rooms, basements and storage spaces instead of going through them and integrating items of true significance into their homes. When that happens the pain of the loss gets anchored in their space for years instead of the joy that is possible when precious items are integrated with their belongings. They can’t move through their grief because the pain associated with the stuff keeps them stuck.

I’m deliberately making decisions with each car load I take from Mom’s room. I am keeping the items that are most precious to me, saving some items for other family members, and donating everything else to charity except items that are trash.

Lest you be worried that I have completely stripped Mom’s room, do not worry! Her furniture, art work, key photos, stuffed animals, and a few decorative items remain to make the space feel homey and inviting.

Has this clearing helped? Yes. I feel calmer about Mom’s passing. When I visit her room feels calm and comfortable. I feel more in control of my emotions and less frantic. I also feel lighter because I have lightened the load of responsibility for what must be done following her death. And, I have found places in my home for the items I chose to keep. Warm touches of Mom speak to me as I move through my home, reminding me of her and our very special relationship.

Letting Go By Clutter Clearing Can Help You


reflections of an anonymous attendee of one of Debbie’s clutter clearing seminars

“It definitely lifts my spirits.

When I was going through some of my things, I was reminiscing over the emotional connections. But, I had these things forever, and they just took up too much space and energy. It was nice to get rid of them because I felt like I was letting go of both good and bad memories/experiences. It made me feel more free and liberated. I felt like I shed off a part of my past and was enabled to live in the present. I know I didn’t have to hold onto an item to regain that feeling, and was able to get rid of them.

I also hold onto a lot of papers and project ideas. I realized that I had had those for years too and was unlikely to start those projects because I already am doing the projects that I’m most passionate about. To get rid of those old projects and papers helped me to re-focus my energy on what’s more important to me.

It also just feels nice to live in a clean, uncluttered environment.”

Ways to Approach Basement Clutter Clearing

So, you’ve decided you really want to clear out your basement. How will youscan0004 approach that enormous task? After all, wanting to clear a basement and actually getting it done are two very different things!

Following are some possible approaches to make it happen.

  • Light a match . . . just kidding! That option might be appealing, but is not really a good idea! I don’t think insurance covers that approach to basement clutter clearing!
  • Commit to 15 minutes of clearing one weekend day for as many weekends as it takes to finish the job. This method is comparable to the way you might approach eating an elephant. If you knew you had to eat an elephant, how would you get the job done? One bite at a time. You may find you want to work longer and that’s great, but make 15 minutes the minimum time you will work. Even though the size of the job is still overwhelming, with this approach you at least make the time commitment small enough per clearing session  to be doable. The trick to this method is to find ways to keep committing to those small chunks of time week after week. Consider rewarding yourself after a successful clearing session (remember, just 15 minutes!) with an experience you’d really enjoy. For example, you might make a trip to Starbucks for a cup of coffee and allow time to enjoy reading the paper.
  • Block off a weekend and tackle the job head on with or without the help of family member and/or friends. This approach is like diving into the deep end of the pool. It’s scary, but you just do it! It can work for people who have the ability to make themselves do things however abhorrent because they want the end result — an organized, functional basement. For this approach to work, you have to have the ability to keep your head down and not let yourself be distracted by the negative energies of the basement contents or the enormity of the task. You also have to be able to regroup from time to time when you feel overwhelmed or mentally fatigued from all the decision-making or exhausted physically from your efforts to move things around and out of the space.
  • Ask a supportive family member or friend to help you clear your basement in exchange for helping them in some way. Spend at least 2 hours working together with your friend or family member assisting. Ask them to move things out of the space as you identify them for donation or trash. Schedule more sessions for this type of help until the job is done. Remember, the person assisting you is just that, an assistant. Make sure you stay in charge of the process. The presence of a supportive other makes it easier to stay focused on the task (if you don’t get distracted by chit chat and other activities), and makes this overwhelming task seem less daunting by becoming a social event instead of an onerous task.
  • Hire a professional organizer and work with him/her in blocks of at least 2 hours until the project is done. Professional organizers know how to approach large projects like clearing a basement. Some can even bring in a team to clear the basement in one or two sessions. Organizers can work side by side with you, helping you make decisions about what to keep, what to toss or donate, and how to reorganize the space once it’s cleared. When you work with a professional organizer you’re likely to be able to get the job done two to four times faster than you could do it alone on a good day. Plus, the end result is likely to be organized in a way that with some effort on your part is easier to keep organized over time.
  • Wait for a hurricane to flood your basement and force you to excavate its contents. Yes, I’m trying to add humor here, but clients have shared their stories of this type of clearing following major hurricanes like Fran, Gaston and Isabelle. I don’t recommend it because it’s pretty traumatic and a really nasty, dirty process.

How will you get your basement cleared? It might be helpful to know that the basement holds the energy of your unconscious. The reward for clearing it could be letting go of some old unconscious beliefs and memories that are barriers to making positive progress in your life. Clear out your basement and you’re likely to feel lighter and more grounded in the present!

Garage Clutter Clearing: The Challenge of Negative Energies

If you have a garage you probably have had this type of experience. You or
DSCN1058your spouse set your intention that this weekend you’re going to tackle the garage. The weekend comes. After your breakfast, coffee and the newspaper you set out for the garage, fully prepared to take on the beast. You open the door to the garage, take a look at the chaos, clutter, dirt and enormous quantities of items to be sorted and organized and you turn on your heel to return to the comfort of your family room and a good book or the TV remote.

Is it any wonder that garages rank right up there with attics, basements, and paper as clutter clearing challenges that are most often avoided? Why is that?

With few exceptions most garages present with a whole host of negative energy challenges. In other words, garages tend to be places that for one reason or another don’t “feel good.” Spaces that don’t feel good energetically push you away. Negative energy repulses. Positive energy attracts.

Why all the negative energy?

  • Garages are typically storage areas of an enormous quantity of items. The numbers of things to be organized, stored and kept in order is overwhelming.
  • Garages are also typically very busy places. Items of all sizes from large yard equipment like lawn mowers and weed eaters to tiny nuts, screws and bolts are stored there.
  • Many of the items in a garage are visible. If they are visible, their energy talks to you all the time. There is no peace in the typical garage with all those various conversations!
  • Garages usually hold various kinds of toxic substances like fertilizers, pesticides, and paints.
  • Garages are the storage area for items that hold “weapon” energy, tools that can do harm. This includes handsaws, drills, axes, chainsaws, hammers and crowbars.
  • Garages are often unfinished spaces with exposed framing. Even though it is common to leave garages unfinished, being unfinished makes them unattractive and feel like spaces waiting for finishing touches to make them more attractive and appealing.
  • Garages are dirty places. Even with the most deliberate attention to keep a garage swept clean, dust, dirt and grime easily accumulate because of their enormous doors and the types of items stored there.
  • Garages are dumping grounds. They are convenient places to drop things on your way into the house. Also, items get dumped in the garage because they is usually room to store things “temporarily” when shifting things around inside your house. Often “temporary” becomes permanent. Plus, when people can’t decide what to do with items, or if they run out of room for things in the house, their mantra often is, “Stick it in the garage.” Unfortunately, once dropped in the garage those items are out of sight, out of mind and become part of the garage chaos.

It is no wonder that most people tend to avoid clearing, cleaning and organizing the garage! It’s negative energy alone can send you for the sofa and the remote control!

Are you now feeling sufficiently overwhelmed? Don’t worry. That’s very normal. However, the garage monster can be tackled. Before that can happen you must be conscious of the sources of negative energy that can shut you down. If you head for the garage unprepared for its common challenges, like the power of its negative energies, you are likely to find yourself on the sofa time and time again.

Once you have an awareness of the sources of negative energy, you can use that knowledge to inform your retreating self that it’s not simply laziness or the inability to do the job that keeps you from clearing out your garage. It is the negative energy of the space as a whole that is dousing your enthusiasm to create order in your garage. With that knowledge and your new awareness of the power of negative energies to shut down clutter clearing and organizing attempts, you can then take a deep breath and seek ways to manage those energies so you can reclaim your garage.

12 Tips to Ensure Peace in your Family Room

A cluttered room, regardless of its furnishings and paint color, is a noisy,

A family room can be peaceful!

A family room can be peaceful!

stressful environment whose negative energy will have a negative effect on the energy of its occupants. Conflicts are more likely to occur in a cluttered space.

When you think about your family room or den, do you sigh with pleasure or groan with displeasure, irritation or overwhelm? Family rooms are gathering spots, high use areas for relaxing at the end of busy days and busy weeks. As such, they tend to attract all kinds of things that have very little to do with relaxing, like computers and other forms of technology, CDs, DVDs, newspapers, magazines, catalogues, toys, art supplies, paper. . . the list goes on! If your family room is cluttered, you are not alone! Family rooms seem to take on a life of their own, especially when more than one person is sharing that space.

Guidelines for a Peaceful Family Room

  1. Remember that everything is alive with energy, and that the energies of items talk to you all the time. The more items you have in the space, the noisier and less peaceful the space will be.
  2. Keep small items like CDs, DVDs, art supplies and games contained and out of sight to quiet their noisy energies.
  3. Limit the number of knick knacks you have out and visible to just a few precious items.
  4. Have a balance between large objects (furniture) and small objects (knick knacks, books, magazines, etc.) in the room, erring on the side of more large objects and fewer small objects.
  5. Keep paper out of the family room. If you bring paper into the room to read or work on, be sure to remove it when you leave. Paper usually has the energy of activity and work, and is not conducive to the function of peace and relaxation of a family room.
  6. Limit the number of framed photos to one to three per surface so each photo can be enjoyed. Large quantities of framed photos on a surface have the energy of a crowd, more annoying than pleasurable. Plus, because the energy of a crowd feels overwhelming, it’s less likely that all the photos will be seen.
  7. Contain your magazines and catalogues to one or two baskets or bins rather than out on tables. If a basket fills up, consider it a sign that it’s time review the contents of the basket and let some items go to recycling or the trash.
  8. Keep side tables clear by using small boxes with lids on side tables to contain small items that are frequently used in the family room, like nail clippers, nail files, pens, note pads, etc. When those items are used, return them immediately to the box.
  9. If you have more than one remote, devote one attractive container to remotes and return all remotes to it at the end of each day.
  10. Teach children that whatever they bring into the room must leave it when they leave, like book bags, school supplies, books, snack wrappers, plates, shoes, iPods, tablets, laptops, etc.
  11. Return the room to order each time you leave it and teach your family members to do the same. Return magazines to their basket, remove newspapers, return dishes to the kitchen, and put CDs and DVDs that were used back in place.
  12. Keep the room clean. Dust and dirt are negative energy. Negative energies can induce negative behaviors, irritation and conflict.

It takes just minutes per day to maintain peace in a family room. And, a peaceful family room can also be trashed and transformed into a chaotic mess in a matter of minutes of thoughtless action. Choose for peace!

Clearing Clutter: Only Keep Parents’ Belongings That You Love

I love this glass bottle. It was in my mother’s home for as long as I can IMG_3750remember. It is one item I chose to keep when clearing items from Mom’s apartment in an attempt to create a simpler, safer environment.

I’ve been clearing out my mother’s belongings since the day she went into assisted living in 2013. First I cleared out her house to prepare it for sale. Over the last two years I’ve taken clothing items from her apartment that she no longer uses or is not likely to use given her changing needs due to the ravages of Alzheimer’s.

More recently in her Alzheimer’s-induced agitation Mom began to pull things from drawers and closets and cabinets, creating visual chaos and obstacles that increased her fall risk. To help calm Mom and eliminate the volume of items that she could move around, I began clearing decorative items, photos, cards plus more clothing in an attempt to simplify her living space.

Each time I take a bag out of Mom’s apartment I sort the items into: trash, donate, give to another family member, and keep for myself. The items I choose for myself have to be “love it” items or items I will use.

The purple vase is a “love it” item. I love the color. I love the quality of the glass. I love the shape. I love that it’s small and fits nicely into our small house. I especially love it because it was Mom’s treasure, a permanent fixture in her home. It holds in place her energy and her love of beautiful colored glass items. When I look at it, I think of Mom and her love for me. Her treasure has become my treasure.

There were many other glass bottles in Mom’s collection. I kept only two. I kept the two that I loved most for their aesthetic qualities. Both hold Mom’s memory and love in place.

When doing the sad task of dismantling a parent’s home, instead of keeping boxes of items to go through at a later date, look for items that you love. Keep those and let go of the rest. Keep items that you love for their aesthetics, the memories they hold in place, and for their association with your parent. 

Mom, Don’t Block Clutter Clearing!

When I work with moms and their children to help clear out and organize

Mom, let her decide what to get rid of!

Mom, let her decide what to get rid of!

children’s rooms and play areas, I often find that a child is ready to part with an item and the mom is not. I once worked with a young girl who really knew what she wanted and what she no longer wanted to have in her space. Her mother, on the other hand, was a sentimental saver who has great difficulty parting with things. I knew I could have a challenge on my hands if we all worked together.

I’ve been in that situation before. Typically the child will identify something to donate to a charity and the mother will say, “Oh, your stuffed penguin, are you sure you want to get rid of that?” At that point I usually intervene and say, “If she wants to get rid of it, let her. If it means that much to you, you keep it.” Inside I’m saying, “It’s a good thing that she wants to get rid of things. Don’t discourage that!”

Fortunately, I’d worked with this client before and had prepared her for our session by encouraging her to let me work with her daughter by myself. I assuaged her fears by letting her know we’d show her what we planned to get rid of. Working alone with the daughter, we were able to find three large garbage bags of toys and craft items to donate and two bags of trash.

My client was so thrilled by our progress that she even allowed us to close two of the bags without checking out what was going out of the house. I am fairly certain we’d have been much less successful if Mom had been involved. Her second-guessing her daughter’s decisions would have slowed our progress and would have led to the daughter either feeling discouraged or angry.

Getting Mom out of the picture was a win-win for both mother and daughter. The child was given the chance to make her own decisions, with me monitoring the process, and the mother was able to get part of her house cleared out without the usual angst and agony.

Moms, if children want to get rid of their belongings, let them! Don’t second guess their decisions! When you second guess their decisions you are teaching them that they really can’t make good decisions on their own. You are teaching them to save instead of purge! Do you really want that?

Support your children’s purging choices. If you think they may regret their decisions, quietly set items aside for a set time. If, after a month the child has not missed the items, let them go. If you cannot let them go, then keep them for yourself. Don’t let your anxiety and difficulty letting go block your children from living a clutter-free life.

Incoming Clutter Negates Clutter Clearing Progress

You’ve been clearing clutter! Yay! You are lightening your load. But, are

Dam the flow of incoming things to make progress with your clutter clearing.

Dam the flow of incoming things to make progress with your clutter clearing.

you? Last night while in conversation with some former ADHD group coaching participants one woman shared that she had gotten about 25 bags/boxes out of her house. We thought that was great progress! However, another astute woman piped up with a great question, “Great! But, but how much is coming in?” The first woman looked slightly uncomfortable and admitted that she was still bringing in stuff. In fact, she enjoyed retail therapy.

Upon further questioning the woman revealed that she was buying things to display after she had cleared her clutter. They were not even things she could enjoy immediately. They became clutter because there was no place for them to go. How ironic that the things she was purchasing to enjoy once her house was clutter-free were creating more clutter.

I suggested that this woman stop buying items in advance of clearing out a room. Rather, that she first clear out the room. Then when the room was clear, she could reward herself with a few new items that could be displayed and enjoyed immediately.

The above incident made me realize that much of my writing has been about how to get rid of clutter. I have never spent much time discussing an important aspect of clutter clearing: stopping the flow of unnecessary items coming into your home.

You can’t make clutter clearing progress if you don’t reduce or stop bringing more things into your home, or at least have a system for eliminating a number of things equal to or greater than the number of things you are bringing in. It’s akin to trying to empty a pool while still adding water to it!

To get the full benefit from clutter clearing, plug the incoming channel. Then focus on eliminating things you no longer love or use.

Feng Shui: Small Changes Lead to Clutter Clearing

IMG_3578Feng shui can be done in small steps. Throw away a dead plant. Clear clutter from a drawer. Add a lamp to a dark area in your home. Add fresh flowers to your kitchen. When you eliminate negative energy (dead things, clutter) and increase positive energy (adding light, add color and plants), you are doing feng shui.

I had the chance to appreciate the power of feng shui when I made a simple change in my kitchen. What started as trimming an overgrown plant ended up being a significant enhancement to the energies in my kitchen.

I trimmed a pothos, a hardy type of philodendron that grows in long vines. Instead of tossing the vines I’d cut off the plant into the trash, I stuffed them in a jar and put the jar on my kitchen counter. That little pop of color and positive energy totally transformed the feel of my kitchen! It’s amazing what a little pop of bright green can do to energize a room. I also added a photo of my beloved Harry and a special rock from my dear friend, Margaret Norman. 

Adding three sources of positive energy really changed the look and feel of my counter. My spirits lift every time my eyes light on the little green plant. The arrangement looked and felt so good that I was motivated to reduce our paper piles on that counter from two to one. Less clutter = good feng shui! Plus, now I work really hard to keep that counter clear. Who knew that sticking green cuttings in a jar could lead not only a daily mood shift but also motivate me to clear clutter and keep it clear!

What small step can you take today to eliminate a source of negative energy and/or add positive energy to your home or office? Clear and enhance! Small steps add up to big changes over time!

Clutter: 5 Negative Effects on Personal Relationships

If you think your clutter affects only you, think again. Feng shui teaches that everything

Clutter creates conflict in relationships.

Clutter creates conflict in relationships.

is connected. Clutter in any area of your home affects the overall energy of the space. The overall energy of the space affects what happens in your life.

Clutter is negative energy. Negative energy repels good things from coming to you. It also can make you feel unsettled, irritable, anxious and overwhelmed. Clutter affects your energy and the energy of everyone in your space even if the clutter is yours alone. The energy of each family member affects their decision-making and behavior. 

Over the years I’ve worked as a professional organizer I’ve seen clutter affect personal relationships in the following ways:

  • It affects your relationship with yourself. Your self-esteem and your thinking and feelings about yourself suffer when you have clutter. You can be very self-critical, forever beating yourself up about your inability to clear your clutter. Clutter blocks you from accessing your gifts and strengths and effectively utilizing them in your life.
  • It affects your relationship with your spouse. Spouses of a cluttered person who are bothered by the condition of the environment express their discomfort in judgment, negative comments, name calling, anger and irritability. Even if your spouse is not openly judgmental, the negative energy of the clutter creates a charged environment in which it is easier to become irritated, agitated and at odds with each other. Clutter also keeps you unconscious of the state of your relationship, it’s growth or lack of growth, issues that need to be addressed, and changes that need to be made for the sake of the relationship. Failure to address clutter challenges can lead to divorce.
  • It affects your relationship with your children. Clutter is distracting. Feng shui teaches that the energy of each item in your space talks to you. Having clutter, therefore, is like having hundreds of little conversations going on all at once. All that noise keeps you distracted, unable to have the mental clarity needed to parent effectively. It also makes it more difficult to stay calm, grounded and make good decisions. In a cluttered space you are more likely to be reactive, saying and doing things that are hurtful to your children.
  • It affects family relationships. The negative energy in cluttered spaces makes everyone less tolerant and more easily irritated and reactive. It distracts from what is really important to sustain healthy family connections. Clutter keeps you focused on what’s wrong, what doesn’t feel good rather than on fostering and investing in positive connections.
  • It affects your relationships with friends and relatives. You may be embarrassed by the condition of your space to the point where you avoid asking people over to visit, to share a meal or to celebrate birthdays and holidays. Barring people from your home can disconnect you from social contacts and eventually result in isolation.

What can you do today to improve your relationships by clearing clutter? If you cannot clear clutter on your own despite your best efforts, email me today to schedule a free 30 minute coaching consultation to determine your next step to clear clutter for the sake of your relationships.

Organized Papers are Empowering!

Papers associated with challenges can empower you when they are organized. I had thegesture-772977_640 chance to observe this first hand when I helped a very dear friend organize papers associated with her son’s very challenging disability.

We faced numerous binders, paper storage containers, and piles of papers, the kind of paper challenge that makes you want to run from the room. We went through all the binders, storage containers and paper, sorting papers into easily identifiable stacks: IEPs, psychiatric evaluations, medical evaluations, reference materials, etc. In the process we got rid of a whole box of paper! By the time we were done she could put her hands on any document she might need, and had plans for sustaining the order we created.

My friend began the sorting process feeling overwhelmed and anxious, focused almost entirely on how very difficult her journey on the painful road to obtain help via a less than cooperative school system and a medical establishment that had led her son down some rough roads. By the time we’d finished she was calmer, and saw the remaining papers not as a big burdensome reminder of her difficult situation, but rather as resources to use as she continues to advocate for her son. The process of purging and organizing those papers not only made the papers more manageable, but also helped her ground herself to face future challenges.

Disorganized papers can keep you anxious and overwhelmed. Organized papers can empower and support you!

Post-Christmas Clutter Clearing for a Great New Year!

The days following the hoopla of Christmas can be a let down. Or, they can be a greatsmiley-798856_1280 opportunity to clear clutter to prepare for a great new year. No doubt you are sitting there with an array of gifts, some that you love and will use, and others that don’t love and wish you didn’t have to deal with.

What will you do with unwanted gifts, gifts that are the wrong size, that you dislike, that you don’t need, that you will never use? You now have the opportunity to practice living with what you love. Feng shui teaches that you will have the best life if you live exclusively with what you love or use. When you love and/or use things, they have positive energy. That positive energy attracts more positive into your life.

But, you may be thinking that you must keep gifts given to you by people that you love. You couldn’t possibly give them away or, God forbid, throw them away. When you hold onto things you don’t love or use or never will use, you are cluttering your home with items that have negative energy. Negative energy attracts more negative into your life.

What are your options?

  1. Keep unwanted items and clutter your house. You will feel burdened by the sense of obligation you feel to keep the items. You will then attract more negative into your life going into a new year.
  2. Re-gift items to people who would really enjoy having them, thereby clearing clutter and preventing the accumulation of negative energy.
  3. Donate items to a charity. That will clear clutter, help people in your community, and prevent the accumulation of negative energy.
  4. Throw items away which will clear clutter, but will also be wasteful, thereby attracting more negative energy.

Any gifts that are re-gifted or donated will lighten your load as you move into the new year. The act of clearing out things that don’t fit with who you are today sets the stage for attracting more of what does fit in the new year.

You have choices to make about what do do with unwanted gifts. Remember, whatever you choose will set the tone for your life in the new year. Will you passively allow unwanted things into your life or will you choose a lighter, more positive path?

Clutter Clearing Strategy While Unpacking from a Move

IMG_2734I recently helped a woman unpack following a move to a new home. She and her husband were downsizing from a 6,000 square foot house to a 3,000 foot house. Once they got to the new home it was immediately apparent that they had no room for many of the items they had packed. It was “get real” time. Time to make hard decisions about what would stay and what would be let go.

Wisely my client had movers put many of their non-immediately essential boxes in the garage until they were ready to unpack them. Rather than moving the boxes into the house to unpack, we opened each box in the garage and sorted items into: keep, donate, trash, recycle. With awareness of the limitations of space in the new home, my client found it much easier to get rid of things as we moved through those boxes than I think she would have if she’d been unloading the boxes from inside the house. As we filled the boxes with items to donate, it was easy to put them in her car which was right outside the garage. Items to keep were grouped together in boxes to go into the house.

At the end of our two hour session we had filled her car with items to donate, and had several other big boxes of items to donate ready for her next trip.

Watching my client clear with gusto made me wonder about what made it possible for her to let go of things so easily. Here’s what I came up with:

  • She was acutely aware of the reality of the size of space available, having already unpacked essential items. She had already experienced the feeling of “too much stuff” in her house. That feeling was so uncomfortable that she was motivated to be much more selective in her choices of things to keep.
  • It was easier to let go of things because they had never been inside that house. Keeping them in the garage kept them from growing emotional roots that would have made clearing that much more difficult.

From this experience I learned the following new strategy for unpacking and clutter clearing following a move: If you have a garage, first open boxes in the garage and do an initial assessment of their contents. Look for items to donate or trash before you take each box into the house.

Clear your clutter BEFORE it takes up residence in your house. It’s easier to do and will ensure that you don’t take the easy way out, keep things you no longer love or use, and then have to work hard to make space for items you don’t need or love.

Prevent Clutter: Make Returns Quickly

What do you do when you buy something only to later realize it was the wrong size,

something that won’t work, or something you just don’t want? Do you return it immediately? Or is your habit to set it aside to return sometime. . .? In my clutter clearing work I’ve learned that many people do nothing with items that really need to be returned. I find numerous bags of items to be returned in clients’ homes. Some haven’t been returned because the person needs to find the receipt. I have a hunch that many items get set aside and then go out of awareness

Things that need to be returned are usually a let down to the purchaser. Then they become work, another item on the over-filled to do list. I view items that need to be returned as “mistakes.” They hold mistake energy. Mistake energy is very negative. If you have too much of it around it’s easy to start feeling like you are a mistake. As more negative feelings and energy become associated with mistake items, it becomes harder and harder to motivate yourself to take action and return them.

I recently made a mistake and ordered two mattress covers that are too heavy to be

Mattress cover mistake.

Mattress cover mistake.

washed in my washing machine. It almost burned out the motor of my washing machine! What a disappointment! Not only that, I was left with a very soggy mattress cover that still needed to be dried before I could ship it back for a refund. So, not only was I disappointed, but I had several more tasks on my to do list: take the cover to a laundromat to dry it in a heavy duty commercial dryer, repackage the mattress covers, and drop the packages off at the post office.

Needless to say, I was not happy to have the extra hassle and the extra work. My first impulse was to just ignore the whole situation for awhile (I’ll bet you can identify with this response!). All three tasks were things I didn’t like doing. They all would eat my limited and valuable time. And, the tasks weren’t as important as many other things on my to do list.

This mistake, however, was hard to ignore. The queen sized mattress covers were not things  that could be stashed away to deal with when I felt like it. Their presence filled my living room. Plus, one cover was wet. If I left it alone, it would become mildewed and stink. That aspect of the situation is what really motivated me to deal with the situation. I didn’t want to add the hassle of having to fix a mildew problem. Plus, I reminded myself that the mattress covers held mistake energy, big mistake energy. I certainly didn’t need that energy affecting me and my husband.

So, I pushed aside my dread, resentment and disappointment, and the mattress cover was dried and both covers were packed up the next day. The following day I dropped them off at the post office. Mission accomplished.

When you realize an item needs to be returned, immediately put it near your car keys so you can take it back out to the car on your next trip to the car. Then, set a deadline for returning it, preferably within 1-2 weeks. Motivate yourself to get the task done by remembering that you are fixing a mistake. Also remember that when you return the item(s), you’ll get money back. Items that never get returned are worth money, money that will go down the drain if you don’t take action.

Clear Clutter: Top of the Bedroom Dresser

You may have learned this the hard way, but it’s best to leave clearing cluttered dresser

Bedroom dressers are best used as decorative surfaces,  not storage areas or dump spots.

Bedroom dressers are best used as decorative surfaces, not storage areas or dump spots.

tops for last in your bedroom clutter clearing efforts. Why? Those surfaces are usually covered with little stuff like jewelry, receipts, business cards, perfumes, coins, knick knacks, photographs and anything else that lands on that tempting flat surface.  If you begin clutter clearing with small stuff, you’re more likely to get overwhelmed by the quantity of decisions to be made and the impossibility of seeing visible progress quickly.

If, on the other hand, you figured out that it’s best to tackle the rest of the room first, good for you! That way you have already improved the energy in your space to a point where facing that dreaded mess of little stuff seems possible.

So, you’re looking at all that little stuff. Where do you begin?

Start by considering the function of that surface. In other words, what kinds of items do you want to have out in the open, either because you love them and they make your heart sing or because you want easy access to them?

Once you make that decision, remove anything from the dresser top that doesn’t fit that function. Move those items in the direction they need to go. For example, if business cards really belong in your home office, place the cards near the door to the room, ready for transport to the home office when you take a break or finish your work for the day. Don’t take those items to the location at that moment. If you do, you may never get back to the dreaded dresser top!

Once you’ve removed those things that don’t fit the dresser top function, sort the remaining items into categories of like items. Clump jewelry with jewelry, perfumes with perfumes, etc. That way you can get an accurate picture of the quantity of each item and you are better able to decide how many of a particular type of item you want to have out in the open. Be very selective about those things that remain on the dresser top because each is alive with an energy that will talk to you while you sleep. Remember, your bedroom will feel more restful if fewer items are visible.

A great option for a dresser top is a box and small containers in which you can store all the little stuff that talks too loudly.

Men find a dresser box helpful for storing nail clippers, other small grooming tools and various odds and ends that could get lost in the depths of drawers. Another option for keeping a dresser top less cluttered is to place a small container to hold loose change or frequently used jewelry. When small items float over the top of a dresser it feels more cluttered. Be sure to use each container for just one category of little stuff. When you mix items in containers you create clutter in a container and can’t easily find and access items you want.

Dresser tops are best treated as decorative surfaces rather than a landing strips for the stuff in your pockets and anything you don’t want to bother moving to its rightful home. Once you identify the function of the dresser top, it will easier to stop yourself from just dropping anything in your hand or pocket onto that surface.

Clear your dresser top and then treat it with respect. The peace of your bedroom depends on it!

Clear Clutter and Create an Attic You Love

I can imagine that many of your are thinking, “Love my attic. Are you kidding?” What2008 Photos 003 would it take for you to love your attic? Attics are not places that we think about loving. They are storage spaces, not areas where you hang out. But, imagine going into your attic without a sense of dread. Imagine actually looking forward to entering your attic. What would that attic look like? How would it feel?

Here are some of my ideas for having an attic that you love:

  • It has been cleared of all things that you no longer love or use and gets cleared at least once a year.
  • It is well organized so you can find things easily.
  • It has space to move around–not packed to the gills!
  • The floors have been swept or vacuumed to remove dust and grime.
  • The things you use most often are conveniently located for easy access.
  • Everything in the space is in good condition and in good working order.
  • Everything in the space has a purpose.
  • It has good lighting.
An attic you can love.

An attic you can love.

An attic like the one I’ve described would certainly not feel like the burden that most attics seem to be. It would still be a storage area, not a place to spend time, but I’ll bet you’d be less likely to procrastinate going there. Perhaps that’s as close to loving your attic as you can get.

Fall is a great time to clear clutter out of your attic! Feng shui teaches that the attic is the area that holds energies of your hopes and aspirations. Make an investment in attaining your hopes and aspirations by decluttering your attic!

New Clothes Lead to Clutter Clearing

Do you have cluttered dresser drawers? Are your drawers packed so full you can’t get anything else in them? Have you stopped putting items in your drawers because it’s too much trouble to cram anything more in them?

2015-08-29 07.37.10Recently I acquired two new shirts to go in my dresser. My shirt drawer had been filling up, and by the time I needed to add those two shirts it was screaming, “No more!” Instead of just cramming them in I decided to practice what I preach, “When you bring in a new item of clothing, make sure you get rid of one. If you want to reduce the volume of clothes you have, get rid of two for every one you bring in.”

I pulled the shirts out and separated them into three piles: T-shirts, short sleeved shirts, long sleeved shirts. As I looked at each shirt I thought about 1) how I look in it, 2) how 2015-08-29 07.39.46often I’d worn it in the last year, 3) what condition it was in, and 4) whether I loved wearing it or not. I just got real when I looked at all my shirts, and was able to let go of a pile of shirts instead of the just two.

When you get too many shirts in a drawer, you can’t see all of them easily. When things can’t be seen, you don’t use them. So, why have them? When you have fewer shirts neatly stacked by type, you can glance at them all quickly and very easily access all your shirts, even one at the bottom of a stack.

An "in control" shirt drawer.

An “in control” shirt drawer.

What does your shirt drawer look like? This is what mine now looks like. It’s amazing how wonderful it feels to have an “in control” shirt drawer full of my favorite shirts.

Clutter: The Risks of Not Doing Clutter Clearing

imagesCAGBLYOU“Risk is a part of life, work, and love. If you leap, a net will appear.”

~Barbara Talisman

When you clear clutter you are taking risks. You could decide you are going to clear a particular space, but then find you can’t get started. You risked and failed at starting. You could start clutter clearing, get stuck, and run for the remote. You risked and bailed out. You could identify items to donate, take them to be donated, and later find you need the very thing you donated.

Those risks can keep many people from achieving their clutter clearing goals. Some people decide it’s better to be cluttered than risk failing or making a mistake. But, what if the risk of not clutter clearing is far greater than the risks associated with clutter clearing?

The risks of NOT clearing your clutter include:

  • not being able to achieve your goals because you can’t find what you need when you need it,
  • missing opportunities because your clutter makes it impossible to think clearly and make good decisions,
  • not being able to achieve your goals because your clutter is so distracting that you lose sight of your goals and/or fail to follow through on opportunities and necessary actions,
  • wasting money in late fees and/or destroying your credit rating because you aren’t able to find your bills to pay them on time,
  • blocking the flow of money and other good things coming into your life,
  • having relationship conflict or even getting divorced because your partner or spouse cannot tolerate the clutter,
  • being lonely and isolated because you don’t want anyone to see the condition of your home, and
  • having health challenges because the negative energy of your clutter affects you physically (breathing problems, autoimmune disorders, heart problems, cancer).

Can you afford to not clear clutter? You can get over making a mistake or failing in your clutter clearing attempts. But, can you afford to risk your productivity, your financial situation, relationships and health? Take a risk. You will survive and be glad you did!

If you need help to move past your fears of failure and/or making a mistake in clutter clearing, email me to schedule a free 30 minute consultation to determine your best next steps to get unstuck and moving to clear your clutter.

Clutter Clearing: Getting Started on P.E.N.S

My clients are so creative! Recently a client referred to a cluttered area of DSCN0882
her house as a P.E.N. That’s a term I’d never heard of in my many years of clutter clearing. So, I asked for a translation. I learned that a P.E.N. is a Place of Extreme Nastiness.

A P.E.N. is a wonderfully creative way to say “hot spot” or “clutter nightmare.” I’m going to venture a guess that most of us have at least one spot in our homes that could be called a P.E.N. When places get to the point of extreme nastiness it can be VERY hard to start clutter clearing.

Why? Because nasty energy is the opposite of inviting. Most of us want to avoid anything nasty. It’s also normal to find the negative energy of a nasty place overwhelming.

So, how do you get started clearing clutter from a P.E.N.? Control your focus.

The mistake that many people make is to focus on how bad, how difficult or how nasty a space is, clearly a negative focus, rather than focusing on what’s possible if the space is improved or eliminated. Bad, difficult and nasty shut you down. The vision of a clean and organized laundry room where you can easily and comfortably get your laundry done will more likely motivate you to take action.

Is your bed good feng shui?

You want a peaceful place to rest and sleep.

Focus on what you want and what good can come from clearing out a P.E.N., and you’ll find motivation to push past the nastiness. Take a deep breath and look over the nasty to find an action you can take to begin clutter clearing. Once you are off and running with the clutter clearing, the nastiness will naturally decrease.

Clutter Clearing Is Hard Work . . . And, Worth It!

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“There are no shortcuts to any place worth going.” Helen Keller

Many people groan when I mention clutter clearing. Why? Probably because they

Clutter clearing makes peace possible.

Clutter clearing makes peace possible.

view clearing clutter as a heavy, boring, onerous task. It is hard work that requires energy, commitment and focus, those very things that are so hard to come by in a world where the norm is to go as fast as you can all the time just to keep up. That perspective keeps people stuck in their clutter and building even bigger clutter challenges.

What if you took Helen Keller’s wise words as your guide? What if you shifted your focus from the drudgery of the process to visualizing a place that is worth going to as a result of your clutter clearing efforts?

Where can clutter clearing take you?

  • to greater mental clarity
  • to loving your space again
  • to feeling better about yourself
  • to being able to find what you need when you need it
  • to increased prosperity
  • to better health
  • to being able to achieve your goals
  • to greater creativity
  • to better relationships
  • to greater peace of mind

Clutter keeps you stuck. Ridding yourself of clutter improves your life. How’s that for a new perspective about clutter clearing!