Tag Archives: procrastinate

Productivity Doesn’t Have to Hurt

No pain, no gain, right? What if that’s not true? According to Gabrielle Bernstein, author of The Universe Has Your Back: Transform Fear to Faith, “We’re taught that we must struggle to achieve and that success comes from ‘making things happen.’ We learn that good things don’t happen without a lot of blood, sweat and tears.”

Where has struggle gotten you? You might be successful in the way our culture judges success, with position and net worth. But, are you happy? What did it cost you to “make things happen”? Perhaps your health? Or, your waistline? Or, your marriage? Or, quality connections with family and friends?

Bernstein offers an alternative to struggle as a way to get ahead. She challenges us to, “move beyond these limiting beliefs of limitation and struggle.” In her words, “I challenge you to accept that you’re here to have fun.”

What a concept! We’re here to have fun. What could that mean for us? It could mean that it’s

Productivity problems disappear when your work is fun and need-fulfilling.

best that we find work that gives us pleasure, floats our boat, and meets needs other than making sure we can pay our bills. It could also mean that if we do work that is fun, we’ll be aligned with  our birthright and can make a bigger difference, make more money, be happier. People who do work that they find fun, pleasurable and need-fulfilling tend to procrastinate less and be more productive.

Good things like productivity, financial success, and accomplishment are more likely to happen when what you do is fun, not a struggle. Find ways to make the work you do fun, and watch your productivity and success soar!

Why You Procrastinate Mailing Returns

Heavy sigh! You’ve just received the shipment of shorts that you badly needed and were sure would be just perfect for summer travels. Alas, they don’t fit! I’ll bet part of your sighing is because you are disappointed that the shorts don’t fit. I’ll also hazard a guess that  another reason for the sigh is because now you are facing the onerous task of mailing back the shorts. The potential positive energy of that new addition to your wardrobe disappeared as soon as you realized they didn’t fit. Now their energy has changed to negative not only because of the fit, but because now they are also associated with work, the work you have to do to return or exchange them.

When things have a negative association (not fitting) and hold negative energies, they repel you. That is one reason you are very likely to put off returning the items. Also, there is nothing fun or exciting about finding the return form, figuring out how to do the return, filling out the form, most of which are challenging to decipher at best, and sealing the package. Then you have to get the package to the post office or UPS, another unexciting item to add to your to do list. What’s your reward? A task done that you’d rather not have had to do. That’s not much reinforcement for your efforts!

I have become very experienced at preparing returns because it is a task that so many of my clients procrastinate. Unreturned items have become part of their clutter. I don’t particularly like doing returns. I find them as annoying as the next person. However, I’ve learned that they are easier to do if instead of focusing on how boring and irritating the task is, I focus on the fact that they are all about money. If I return mistakes, items that don’t fit or don’t measure up to my expectations, I get a refund.

When I work with clients I focus on how the task will benefit them. Money will be refunded, or the mistake will be fixed by exchanging items. Also, when I complete those returns I remove a heavy weight from my clients’ shoulders. Items that haven’t been returned hold energies that communicate messages like this: “you are letting money slip through your fingers,” “you should be responsible and return these things,” or “all you do is make mistakes.” Plus I’m helping clients improve the energy of their spaces. When items are returned that source of negative energy disappears and the space immediately feels better.

I recommend preparing returns within a week of receiving something that doesn’t work for you. Why one week? Every day you put off doing the return, negative energy increases making it harder to motivate yourself for the task. I say one week because it may not be possible to prepare the return during a busy work week. You may need to wait for a weekend to be able to focus on the task.

Returns not done = wasted money, negative energy, feeling burdened, annoyed, irritated, and being stuck. Returns done = money, peace of mind, positive energy, lightness and relief. Remember that, and send back items as quickly as you can.

Procrastination: Normal vs. Problematic

Not all procrastination is created equal. We all procrastinate, probably every day. It is very normal to put off doing tasks for a variety of reasons: you don’t feel like doing the task; you’d rather do something else; the task will take longer than the time available; you don’t have enough mental energy for the task; the task is too hard to do on your own; the task is not the most important thing to do at the moment, etc. The list goes on and on.

It is normal to procrastinate. You can’t do everything at once. You must make choices about how to use your time and energy. I might put off taking the garbage out tonight or put off taking suitcases to the attic. If I wait to do those tasks for a day or two, there will only be a minor inconvenience. That is what I call “normal” procrastination.

If those tasks are not accomplished for a week, and other tasks are put off as well, what began as minor visual and perhaps olfactory disturbances could grow into a more serious problem, one that will take much more time and energy to address. What started as normal procrastination then becomes “problematic” procrastination.

Normal procrastination is usually short-term, involves small, less important tasks, and results in few serious consequences. It becomes problematic procrastination when small tasks are postponed more frequently and for longer periods of time or when important tasks (e.g. those that affect finances, job, relationships, health) are put off to the point of crisis. The price for problematic procrastination can be very high — loss of reputation, job difficulties or loss, relationships challenges or divorce, deterioration or loss of residence, financial difficulties (problems with the IRS, bankruptcy, ruined credit), and health deterioration to name a few.

We all procrastinate. Do you procrastinate in a way that has no serious consequences or does it lead to challenges in many areas of your life? If you would describe your procrastination as problematic, your procrastination could be caused by ADHD. ADHD is a mechanical problem in the brain whose symptoms include difficulty with starting tasks (procrastinating), particularly those that are boring and uninteresting.

If you have ADHD or think you have it, treatment for the disorder can help you procrastinate less and get more done. Schedule a FREE 30-60 minute Back on Track phone coaching session today to discuss your procrastination challenges and options for help to procrastinate less and be more productive.

Change Your Thoughts, Procrastinate Less

Procrastination is a choice fueled by convincing thoughts. I became fully aware of this recently

When a task seems too big, take your focus off the forest and start with a tree!

When a task seems too big, take your focus off the forest and start with a tree!

when a coaching client told me that in her effort to procrastinate less she’d begun to watch her thoughts prior to procrastinating. 

As expected, certain thoughts showed up time and time again. Her thought repertoire included: I’m too tired; it will take too long to do; I don’t know how to do this; I don’t want to waste time trying to figure out how to do this; it’s too big; and I probably won’t finish it anyway. Sound familiar? 

Did you notice the energy of those words? Primarily negative and energy draining. Of course you are going to procrastinate if limiting thoughts and beliefs predominate! Negative thoughts breed stagnation.

Becoming aware of your procrastination thoughts is the first step to reducing procrastination. What are your procrastination thoughts? Once you recognize the thoughts that lead to procrastination, you can counter those negative thoughts with a dose of reality and with positive thoughts that encourage taking action. Following are some examples.

Countering Procrastination Thoughts

“I’m too tired.”

Dose of reality: Who hasn’t used this thought to put off sorting mail, starting a new project, etc.! The truth is that intentionally taking action to accomplish any task can give you energy. When you are not taking action, your energy stagnates. When you step into action, you break the stagnation and free energy that is available is then available to you.

More helpful thoughts: “Am I really tired or am I procrastinating?” “I can always take one step.”

“I don’t know how to do this.”

Dose of reality: It’s amazing how long this thought will keep people stuck. You may not know how to do the task, but I’ll bet you know someone who does know how to do it. Or, you probably are capable of seeking out resources to help you accomplish the task. What if you ignored that shut down message and spent a few minutes considering what needs to be done? Perhaps you might even be able to figure it out on your own. 

More helpful thoughts: “I may not know how to do it, but I can ask for help.” “ I have been successful figuring things out in the past. I can do it now.”

“It’s too big.”

Dose of reality: This statement reflects shut down due to overwhelm. Some people can only see the forest, not the trees. The forest is daunting. A single tree is manageable. Any task can be broken down into small steps if you take your eyes off the forest and look at the trees that make up the forest. If you take a tree (small step) at a time, you can get a big task done. Some tasks really are to big to tackle on your own. That’s when it’s time to ask for help.

More helpful thoughts: “This task is too big to do all at once. I can do it one step at a time.” “I can do this task with help from _____________ .

Watch your thoughts! Notice which thoughts keep you procrastinating. Look for and use new positive thoughts to motivate you to get unstuck and moving in the direction you want to go. As you procrastinate less often, you’ll feel the weight of procrastinated tasks lift, you’ll be more productive, and your self-esteem will grow.